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How to build confidence from scratch

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How to build confidence from scratch

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Michael Edwards, better known as Eddie “The Eagle” is a British skier whom no one believed in before he made it to the Olympics.

Eddie was slightly overweight, extremely far sighted (he wore thick glasses) and trained in second hand equipment. At times he even stayed in a Finnish mental hospital because he couldn’t afford genuine accommodation. Many people came to doubt his ability as a skier. If he didn’t have confidence in himself, he could never have endured all this, and never would have made it to the Olympics; which he did, and became internationally loved as a figurehead and emblem of the Olympic spirit.

When I think about all the great people like Eddie, who achieved greatness through their confidence, I wonder where it came from. I don’t think confidence came naturally to them. It didn’t come naturally to me.

If confidence doesn’t come naturally, where is it from?

When I was a small child, before attending school I remember my friends and I seemed almost limitless in confidence. We lived fearlessly. Though all our lives were open to us, we never looked forward and worried. We had not collected any regrets. I remember nobody seemed more confident than anyone else, nobody carried themselves as superior.

All this changed at school. In school, competition is entrenched. It didn’t matter what we did or studied, whether we studied English, Art, P.E, some naturally stuck out, scored better and were rewarded for it. Our conduct at school even separated us. This in turn seemed to affect self confidence.

I was never a straight-a student. My grades were good but not great. I was never one of the kids rewarded for some high grade or performance, and never had their levels of self esteem.

Confidence for me came later.

In high school, I discovered my passion for technology. I loved writing code (I still do) and each successful program I wrote, each line of effective code was rewarding to me in a way I never felt before. Each time something didn’t work, or when I came across a difficult bug to overcome, I was presented with an exciting challenge. I received no praise in school for it, no accolades, but that didn’t matter. I was doing what I loved, and every time after solving a difficult coding problem, my confidence grew.

Here I discovered something that changed my entire outlook on confidence and ability. Self confidence can never be found outside. It is something that only comes from you. No matter how much you look, or where you look, no matter how much praise you do or don’t get, you will never find confidence unless it comes from within.

Confidence came from working though difficulties, making myself work on challenging pieces. It didn’t seem to matter if I succeeded or failed (but I’ve long known that even if you fail a hundred times, you will succeed if you are able to keep trying). I only needed to keep pushing myself and confidence grew as a result.

Confidence comes when challenges are overcome

When struggles are overcome, it feels good, and there’s a great deal of satisfaction. From this satisfaction comes confidence.

Perhaps you have an unhealthy lifestyle and losing weight, doing exercises and going on diets are the difficult things for you. Perhaps, you are shy. Delivering a talk in front of a large audience will then be something difficult to you. Or perhaps you are a perfectionist, then embracing mistakes will be the most difficult thing for you.

No matter what it might be, you probably felt proud, strong, and sure in your abilities once you overcame that obstacle. That is the true feeling of confidence earned through effort and experience.

Confidence grows from doubt and criticism

There will be setbacks and disappointments. There will be failures because many breakthroughs require trial and error. There will be criticisms because everyone is far from perfect at the very beginning.

When I first started Lifehack, it took a long time to gain readers. It took me a while to get 100 visitors. This was difficult for me because I had great ambitions for this site, and for a time it seemed doomed to fail. I received plenty of criticism. Some thought that the world didn’t need another advice site, others thought there was something wrong with the idea itself. It was hard for me not to listen to them and agree.

But in the end, I believed in my dream and persisted. I tweaked the layout, reconsidered how the articles would be structured and written. Made the site more user friendly. The team grew with the hiring of some extremely dynamic and talented people. With each determined effort, the site grew in popularity, and a few years later we have now influenced millions.

Pushing out of my comfort zone and getting past the most difficult challenges were the greatest factors in growing my confidence.

Pushing yourself through is tough, I’m not denying that. They wouldn’t be called “challenges” if it were otherwise. But there is a quote by Churchill that I think about whenever I am faced with new ones, a quote that I feel related to everything I’ve written about above:

“If you’re going through hell, keep going”

Some people avoid challenges. Perhaps they may have failed at something one too many times, perhaps they’ve been told that they lack something needed to succeed. Instead they rely on stability, coasting through life. This can be fine for them, but ultimately its restrictive. They will never grow in confidence, and their fear of failure will become so powerful that will give up before seeing success.

The key to self confidence is to face every challenge head on. With every challenge you face and overcome, your confidence will grow to face the next. Welcome the challenges that come, don’t avoid them. They are all opportunities in disguise to feed your growth.

How to build confidence from scratch

How to build confidence from scratch

By Leon Ho

Michael Edwards, better known as Eddie “The Eagle” is a British skier whom no one believed in before he made it to the Olympics.

Eddie was slightly overweight, extremely far sighted (he wore thick glasses) and trained in second hand equipment. At times he even stayed in a Finnish mental hospital because he couldn’t afford genuine accommodation. Many people came to doubt his ability as a skier. If he didn’t have confidence in himself, he could never have endured all this, and never would have made it to the Olympics; which he did, and became internationally loved as a figurehead and emblem of the Olympic spirit.

When I think about all the great people like Eddie, who achieved greatness through their confidence, I wonder where it came from. I don’t think confidence came naturally to them. It didn’t come naturally to me.

If confidence doesn’t come naturally, where is it from?

When I was a small child, before attending school I remember my friends and I seemed almost limitless in confidence. We lived fearlessly. Though all our lives were open to us, we never looked forward and worried. We had not collected any regrets. I remember nobody seemed more confident than anyone else, nobody carried themselves as superior.

All this changed at school. In school, competition is entrenched. It didn’t matter what we did or studied, whether we studied English, Art, P.E, some naturally stuck out, scored better and were rewarded for it. Our conduct at school even separated us. This in turn seemed to affect self confidence.

I was never a straight-a student. My grades were good but not great. I was never one of the kids rewarded for some high grade or performance, and never had their levels of self esteem.

Confidence for me came later.

In high school, I discovered my passion for technology. I loved writing code (I still do) and each successful program I wrote, each line of effective code was rewarding to me in a way I never felt before. Each time something didn’t work, or when I came across a difficult bug to overcome, I was presented with an exciting challenge. I received no praise in school for it, no accolades, but that didn’t matter. I was doing what I loved, and every time after solving a difficult coding problem, my confidence grew.

Here I discovered something that changed my entire outlook on confidence and ability. Self confidence can never be found outside. It is something that only comes from you. No matter how much you look, or where you look, no matter how much praise you do or don’t get, you will never find confidence unless it comes from within.

Confidence came from working though difficulties, making myself work on challenging pieces. It didn’t seem to matter if I succeeded or failed (but I’ve long known that even if you fail a hundred times, you will succeed if you are able to keep trying). I only needed to keep pushing myself and confidence grew as a result.

Confidence comes when challenges are overcome

When struggles are overcome, it feels good, and there’s a great deal of satisfaction. From this satisfaction comes confidence.

Perhaps you have an unhealthy lifestyle and losing weight, doing exercises and going on diets are the difficult things for you. Perhaps, you are shy. Delivering a talk in front of a large audience will then be something difficult to you. Or perhaps you are a perfectionist, then embracing mistakes will be the most difficult thing for you.

No matter what it might be, you probably felt proud, strong, and sure in your abilities once you overcame that obstacle. That is the true feeling of confidence earned through effort and experience.

Confidence grows from doubt and criticism

There will be setbacks and disappointments. There will be failures because many breakthroughs require trial and error. There will be criticisms because everyone is far from perfect at the very beginning.

When I first started Lifehack, it took a long time to gain readers. It took me a while to get 100 visitors. This was difficult for me because I had great ambitions for this site, and for a time it seemed doomed to fail. I received plenty of criticism. Some thought that the world didn’t need another advice site, others thought there was something wrong with the idea itself. It was hard for me not to listen to them and agree.

But in the end, I believed in my dream and persisted. I tweaked the layout, reconsidered how the articles would be structured and written. Made the site more user friendly. The team grew with the hiring of some extremely dynamic and talented people. With each determined effort, the site grew in popularity, and a few years later we have now influenced millions.

Pushing out of my comfort zone and getting past the most difficult challenges were the greatest factors in growing my confidence.

Pushing yourself through is tough, I’m not denying that. They wouldn’t be called “challenges” if it were otherwise. But there is a quote by Churchill that I think about whenever I am faced with new ones, a quote that I feel related to everything I’ve written about above:

“If you’re going through hell, keep going”

Some people avoid challenges. Perhaps they may have failed at something one too many times, perhaps they’ve been told that they lack something needed to succeed. Instead they rely on stability, coasting through life. This can be fine for them, but ultimately its restrictive. They will never grow in confidence, and their fear of failure will become so powerful that will give up before seeing success.

The key to self confidence is to face every challenge head on. With every challenge you face and overcome, your confidence will grow to face the next. Welcome the challenges that come, don’t avoid them. They are all opportunities in disguise to feed your growth.

How to Build Confidence From Scratch was originally published on Lifehack

About the Author

Leon Ho is the Founder and CEO of Lifehack, which he started in 2005 as a way to share his personal productivity hacks to make life easier.

Confidence is an amazing thing that can literally turn your life around for the better. Fortunately, it’s also not the mysterious thing some people seem to think it is. Instead, confidence is something that can be learned by anyone. In this article, Beauty and Tips offers help with building confidence up from scratch.

Confidence gives you unprecedented power to go out there and achieve all that you want from life. Confidence gives you the power to live life on your own terms. It lets you assert yourself with people, makes it so much easier to ask a guy out, land the job of your dreams and take unbelievable but beautiful risks that are rich with rewards.

Doesn’t is sound amazing? It sure does. But it also kinda sucks when we see other people with lots of confidence winning at life, while we’re still scared of leaving the house in our new dress that probably looks silly on us. However, all the confidence in the world is yours if you want it. No one was born confident. The only reason some women have more confidence than you is because they have learned how to excel at it. They’ve mastered the skills and knowledge and developed the habits that all confident people have. And now you can, too. Let’s take a look at how to build confidence up from scratch.

Forgo ALL Negativity

Negativity swirls around us all the time – if we let it. It picks up momentum like a typhoon and destroys all in sight – but only if we let it. You might suppose that negativity isn’t something you can escape.

“How can I escape negativity when there are wars going on all the time?”

It’s up to us to decide what we choose to watch/read and listen to. It’s also up to us to decide who we hang out with. You can either put a filter and filter out the negativity – or you can continue immersing yourself in it.

Negativity tells you that you can’t do something. It tells you that you’re not good enough. It reminds you that life is rubbish, we can’t change our environment, so what’s the point?

Only, confident people have got this all figured out. They forgo all negativity and focus only on positive things. This is one of the greatest tips on how to build confidence. Confident people watch positive videos, read constructive books, and hang out with positive people. All of which tells them they are good enough and they can do this.

Smile!

What’s in a smile? Everything. A smile tells people you’re happy and confident. It makes them feel happy, too. More importantly, it makes you feel happy and confident. People who smile automatically feel good about themselves. All of a sudden, there is a spring in their step. They can totally do this!

Try it. Spend some more time smiling and see how it affects your self-esteem. It’s such a great tip on how to build confidence. You’ll surely find that you’ve got more optimism and more of a feel-good, I-can-do-this and life-is-not-so-scary factor.

Take Pride In Your Appearance

It’s amazing what impact our appearance can have on our confidence. Sometimes, all it takes is a fantastic new hair style and all of a sudden we feel as though we can ace our next job interview or wow our first date. Clothes make the woman, so it’s important that you dress to impress, it’s a good advice on how to build confidence from scratch. If your wardrobe has always been too dowdy and your hair is too plain but you literally don’t know how to improve things, talk to someone who does. Seek out the services of your best-dressed, hippest-looking, fashion-obsessed friend and ask them to help you out. Get them to take you clothes shopping, pay a visit to their stylist and get the killer look you’ve always dreamed of. It will work wonders for your confidence.

Grow Your Knowledge

Ever watched a talk-show guest chat away full of confidence? It’s because they know what they’re talking about. People like this are so sure of themselves and what they’re saying that they emit lots of confidence. And you know what? YOU can, too! Knowledge is power. It gives us confidence because we KNOW we are right about something.

Pick a subject you want to learn more about and grow your knowledge. Even the act of learning itself will give you confidence. You will feel great! And the more you know, the more you can’t be caught out by things that rock your confidence.

Think Positively

If you take a close look at confident people, you’ll notice one sure thing they all have in common: They’re all positive people. You literally won’t find a confident person who is alway down in the dumps. Confident people have learned that always looking on the bright side of life makes them more comfortable in their own skin. When they focus on what can go right instead of what can go wrong, they’re sure that the right things will happen. It’s like when you go for a job interview. If you head into an interview expecting the worst possible outcome, your body language and behaviour will reflect that. Your shoulders will drop, your conversation will be defeatist and you’ll barely raise a smile.

So our tip on how to build confidence is to fill yourself with positive thoughts, feel good about the world and your role in it, and confidence will come naturally.

Know Your Values

Another thing that confident people have in common is that they know their values inside out. They know what means more to them in life than anything else, and they know that these values won’t be compromised. Every decision they make is in accordance with these values, values that they know are taking them towards their goals in life.

So our final tip on how to build confidence is to write down your values. Then, you can start to make decisions that are in accordance with them. This will give you the confidence that you are always making the right call. Even if someone disagrees with you, you KNOW you are being true to yourself. And this kind of confidence is breathtaking.

Do you have other tips on how to build confidence?

Discover New Perspectives

Self-confidence is something everyone loves to have. And building one’s confidence is not so difficult. In fact, you can build your confidence from scratch. There are various ways to go about this. Some of the ways that you can use to build your confidence from scratch will be discussed.

AVOID NEGATIVE THOUGHTS

The first criterion for building self-confidence is to avoid all negative thoughts. To build your confidence from scratch, you should do away with all your negative thoughts because negative thoughts are a stumbling block and they prevent people from reaching their full potential. Thoughts like “I cannot do this”, “This is impossible”, “I will likely fail if I try this”, “This is not for people like me”, and other similar thoughts must be avoided. People who usually find excuses to avoid doing things are known to exhibit lack of self-confidence and low self-esteem.

BELIEVE IN YOURSELF

If you must build your confidence, you need to learn to do things. You have to believe in yourself. Undertake tasks and do not be scared of failing. It is better to try and fail than never to try at all. Trying makes you get better at what you do. And the better you get, the more confident you are about doing that thing. To buttress this point, there is a proverb that says “practice makes perfect.” This means that the more you practice something, the better you get at it. And being good at doing something plays a huge role in developing your self-confidence.

There is also a saying that “those who said it cannot be done should not interrupt those that are trying to do it.” This is a very powerful quote that needs to be put into practice. If you want to build your self-confidence then you should join the category of people who get things done by trying and not the category of people who believe that they cannot do it. In order to be able to achieve this, try to create positive thoughts. Thoughts like “I know that I can do this”, “I can succeed if I try to do this”, “People who have been doing this are not better than me”, “if somebody can do this then I should be able to”, and so on.

DEVELOP YOURSELF

Going to school or being educated will equip you with resources needed to become successful in your career. However, developing yourself will make you have confidence. If you want to build your self-esteem and increase your knowledge in any field then you have to develop yourself. It is not compulsory that you must sit for every exam but just ensure that you read books on various topics, and read widely. Numerous successful people have confirmed that reading widely improves their vocabulary and language skills, which in turn, boosts their confidence. Most of these successful people do not usually have time to undertake lectures, go to classrooms, complete assignments and carry out other activities required of students taking professional and/or developmental courses. So, they ensure that read different books whenever they are free or when they want to relax.

THINK OF HOW YOU WANT TO BE

Another way that you can build your confidence is to visualize or imagine how you to want to be. Having an idea or a perception of how you want to be will make it possible for you to have a plan that will guide you to successfully achieve your goals. Visualisation has been known to be a very useful technique that helps people struggling with low self-confidence to build their confidence.

LOVE YOUR PHYSICAL APPEARANCE

One factor that can make someone to have a low self-confidence is hating or disliking his physical appearance. The trick to change this perception is to always look in the mirror and appreciate what you see. Do not compare yourself to anybody else. Instead of trying to be somebody else, develop yourself into who other people will want to be like. When you look at yourself in the mirror, say “I know that I am special, and I can become who I want to be”. You can equally make other positive and uplifting statements.

As discussed above, believing in yourself plays a very crucial role in building your confidence.

TAKE ACTION

Do not only have positive thoughts and/or believe in yourself but also take action. Taking action is the most important factor in personal development and building of self-confidence. Successful people did not become successful by just having positive thoughts but by taking actions to bring their thoughts to reality.

People who want to become successful must have self-confidence, they must be tenacious, they must be passionate, they must be aggressive, they must be persistent, and most importantly, they must be hardworking. So, if you wish to be successful then you should adopt all those attributes that are listed.

ASSOCIATE WITH SUPPORTIVE PEOPLE

Associating with the people who love you is another way that you can build your confidence. These people can be family and friends. However, among friends and family, there are people who can dampen your spirit, the killjoys. Try as much as possible to stay away from such people. The point here is that you should get closer to the people who will commend you when you do something good and avoid those that will criticize you when you make a mistake. The more you receive commendations, the more your confidence increases.

Finally, it is always strongly advocated that people build confidence from scratch so that it will be easy for them to succeed in a dynamic world or environment. Consequently, it should be known that the people who have remarkable confidence and self-esteem are those that learned how to build them from scratch.

How do you build confidence from scratch?

Confidence is a precious commodity as a cyclist, and sometimes all it takes is one bad race to lose it for weeks if not longer.

It is critical to put disappointing results or difficult days behind you. You have to pivot once a bad day is over and look ahead to the next challenge using a positive mindset to give you energy and confidence to turn that corner. Your outlook and perspective has a powerful influence on your energy level, and if you can make it a positive one, you will find yourself able to confidently move forward.

The fastest and most effective way to create this positive energy is by looking inward at yourself. The simple reflection and self-awareness of personal abilities, skills, and direction you possess in which you view as positive creates on energized self-confidence. A place to help you quickly find this positive self attributes that create this energized confidence could be you found in something you have been doing well recently in training. Whatever the positive self-attributes you have, you must look inward to start the flame of self-confidence.

Sounds easy enough right? But it’s not! Not at all. In today’s world, negativity is everywhere flooding and suffocating us before we even have a chance to look inward — at races, group rides, on Twitter. The people with negative things to say are very loud. Also, be aware of the trap of becoming negative yourself to join the others. Expressing negativity is an easy way to bond with other people because everyone has something negative to gripe about.

But at the end of the day, it is you who is responsible for your success. Your struggles, whether they are your fault or not, it is your choice to get stuck with insecurity, or move forward with positive confidence.

What you will experience is that the world will look like you want it to. In every race, ride, workplace interaction, or anything else, there’s always a good and a bad side. You can either see it positively or negatively. Challenge yourself to take a negative situation and flip it. Find the positive in it and feel energized with the self confidence you pivot with.

Young people are drinking less than previous generations with Gen Z increasingly opting to break with Britain’s notorious drinking culture.

© Charlie Martina Charlie Martina launched the University of Liverpool’s Sober Society after choosing to stop drinking

Among these is Charlie Martina who developed a drinking problem during her undergrad years at the University of Liverpool. Drinking masked Charlie’s nerves, turning her from a “shy and anxious” person to someone “cool and interesting”. She said the drinking culture in the UK meant she never questioned whether using alcohol to cope with mental illness could be a problem.

That got worse at university, where nights out, pub crawls and drinking games are a big part of student life. Many society socials revolve around alcohol and drinking is how Charlie met most of her friends. She said: “It was just a really big part of my life.

“I’ve always struggled with my mental health. When I was drinking, it was really hard to tell what was my mental health problems and what was a drinking problem. I wouldn’t have called it a drinking problem at first, but it’s a vicious cycle. My mental health would be really bad, so I would drink, and then because I drank, my mental health would be worse, and it just carried on like that.”

Video: Loose Women’s Nadia shares what ‘led her to obesity’ (Liverpool Echo)

Blood Red: Liverpool backed to spend ‘big money’ on signing Jordan Henderson replacement

Blood Red: Michael Edwards’ Top 5 Liverpool FC Transfer Deals

Blood Red: Ben Davies Has Outlined His Immediate Liverpool Future

Blood Red: Sadio Mane’s Top 5 Liverpool FC Moments

Love Island preview: Ekin-Su says Jay is ‘biggest player’ in the villa

Police block road after kids throw bricks off bingo roof

Coronation Street’s Charlie Condou explains how Kathy Burke helped him father a child

Blood Red: Manchester United ‘interested’ in hiring Michael Edwards after Liverpool exit

Blood Red: Liverpool Fans Host Jubilant Victory Parade To Celebrate Carabao & FA Cup Wins

ITV This Morning: The Sugarbabes pay tribute to their ‘amazing’ fans

S Club 7 star Jo O’Meara speaks about gambling addiction on Lorraine

Everton Star Richarlison linked with move to Chelsea

  • Blood Red: Liverpool backed to spend ‘big money’ on signing Jordan Henderson replacement Blood Red: Liverpool backed to spend ‘big money’ on signing Jordan Henderson replacement Liverpool Echo
  • Blood Red: Michael Edwards’ Top 5 Liverpool FC Transfer Deals Blood Red: Michael Edwards’ Top 5 Liverpool FC Transfer Deals Liverpool Echo
  • Blood Red: Ben Davies Has Outlined His Immediate Liverpool Future Blood Red: Ben Davies Has Outlined His Immediate Liverpool Future Liverpool Echo

Eventually she snapped out of it but going sober meant building her confidence up from scratch and learning how to make new friends during her Philosophy MA at the university without the help of booze. Charlie wanted to create a space where she and other sober students could make friends, so she set up the Sober Society.

Sitting at a freshers fair stall as hungover students laughed at the idea, she worried no one would join. The society now has roughly 300 members. Charlie said: “I really didn’t expect it, but I think things are changing slowly.

Although drinking culture still is a really big thing among students, it’s been really nice to have a safe space where we can just hang out and get to know each other and sort of get deep without having to drink, because I think when you make those bonds with people, you often are drinking.”

For 18-year-old Othman Ibrahim, making friends while sober is nothing new because he’s never had alcohol. Growing up in Saudi Arabia, where it is strictly prohibited, dabbling in drinking wasn’t something he did as a teen. Now a first year architectural engineering student at the University of Liverpool, he finds people respectful, tolerant and inclusive of his sobriety.

But socialising can be a challenge sometimes. Othman said: “It is hard in the sense that, on the weekends when it is actually time to go out, it’s really hard to hang out with my English friends because the only thing they want to do is go out and drink or go to clubs, which I don’t feel comfortable doing since I don’t drink.”

Instead he hangs out with other people who don’t drink or are from similar backgrounds, or he stays with his friends who drink until they get drunk enough for him to be ready to go home. Like Charlie, Othman finds the culture of binge drinking “weird”, but he has been curious about what it feels like to be drunk – just not enough to be tempted into trying it.

Charlie is happy with her decision to stop, saying: “There’s never a moment in my mind that I doubt that I’ve made the right decision. I never actually think that [drinking] would be the best thing for me because I know that it’s not. I’ve changed a lot since I stopped drinking. I’ve stopped doing things I’m not proud of. I’m a nicer person, a better friend, a better student, a more interesting person. Like I have hobbies and interests, I’m into yoga and meditation and philosophy, and I’m actually into those things.”

Up until this point, if you have been following my journey of teaching myself test automation

We have basically been teaching ourselves how to automate web application functional flow using selenium webdriver with java

So far it has been about developing individual automated scripts / test cases using selenium webdriver with java.

To maintain these test cases we will need to make use of a structured framework

Automation test framework is used to maintain automated test cases, error debugging, reporting of test results, store and use of data, bulk run test cases, scheduling test runs and reporting and much more

The various Components Of A Automation Test Framework

To be confident and comfortable in developing a automation test framework from scratch you have to obtain an in dept understanding \ knowledge of all the independent components / technology that are used in it’s development

You will need detailed knowledge on all the

1. TestNG

Unit testing framework used with java

2. Data Driven Testing

Common shared data source which test scripts tap into as need arises during test design and execution

3. Maven

Used to build and manage software projects form scratch

4. Jenkins

Used in setting up a continuous integration and continuous delivery environment

5. Test Automation Reports

Use of framework to simplify and standardize test reporting

6. Log4j

A popular error logging package for java

7. Page Object Model

Used to enhance test automation maintenance and to reduce code duplication

We will now create blogs addressing each component above which when all brought together forms a solid automation test framework

Navigate To Day 30

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Thanks in advance for all your support. Much appreciated.

Classification and object detection are the main parts of computer vision. Classification is finding what is in an image and object detection and localisation is finding where is that object in that image. Detection is a more complex problem to solve as we need to find the coordinates of the object in an image.

To Solve this problem R-CNN was introduced by Ross Girshick, Jeff Donahue, Trevor Darrell and Jitendra Malik in 2014. R-CNN stands for Regions with CNN. In R-CNN instead of running classification on huge number of regions we pass the image through selective search and select first 2000 region proposal from the result and run classification on that. In this way instead of classifying huge number of regions we need to just classify first 2000 regions. This makes this algorithm fast compared to previous techniques of object detection. There are 4 steps in R-CNN. They are as follows :-

  1. Pass the image through selective search and generate region proposal.
  2. Calculate IOU (intersection over union) on proposed region with ground truth data and add label to the proposed regions.
  3. Do transfer learning using the proposed regions with the labels.
  4. Pass the test image to selective search and then pass the first 2000 proposed regions from the trained model and predict the class of those regions.

How to build confidence from scratch

I am going to implement full R-CNN from scratch in Keras using Airplane data-set from http://www.escience.cn/people/JunweiHan/NWPU-RESISC45.html . To get the annotated data-set you can download it from link below. The code for implemented RCNN can also be found in the below mentioned repository.

Once you have downloaded the dataset you can proceed with the steps written below.

First step is to import all the libraries which will be needed to implement R-CNN. We need cv2 to perform selective search on the images. To use selective search we need to download opencv-contrib-python. To download that just run pip install opencv-contrib-python in the terminal and install it from pypi.

After downloading opencv-contrib we need to initialise selective search. For that we have added the above step.

Now we are initialising the function to calculate IOU (Intersection Over Union) of the ground truth box from the box computed by selective search. To understand more about calculating IOU you can refer to the link below.

How to build confidence from scratch

The above code is pre-processing and creating the data-set to pass to the model. As in this case we can have 2 classes. These classes are that whether the proposed region can be a foreground (i.e. Airplane) or a background. So we will set the label of foreground (i.e. Airplane) as 1 and the label of background as 0. The following steps are being performed in the above code block.

  1. Loop over the image folder and set each image one by one as the base for selective search using code ss.setBaseImage(image)
  2. Initialising fast selective search and getting proposed regions using using code ss.switchToSelectiveSearchFast() and ssresults = ss.process()
  3. Iterating over all the first 2000 results passed by selective search and calculating IOU of the proposed region and annotated region using the get_iou() function created above.
  4. Now as one image can many negative sample (i.e. background) and just some positive sample (i.e. airplane) so we need to make sure that we have good proportion of both positive and negative sample to train our model. Therefore we have set that we will collect maximum of 30 negative sample (i.e. background) and positive sample (i.e. airplane) from one image.

After running the above code snippet our training data will be ready. List train_images=[] will contain all the images and train_labels=[] will contain all the labels marking airplane images as 1 and non airplane images (i.e. background images) as 0.

How to build confidence from scratch

After completing the process of creating the dataset we will convert the array to numpy array so that we can traverse it easily and pass the datatset to the model in an efficient way.

Now we will do transfer learning on the imagenet weight. We will import VGG16 model and also put the imagenet weight in the model. To learn more about transfer learning you can refer to the article on link below.

In this part in the loop we are freezing the first 15 layers of the model. After that we are taking out the second last layer of the model and then adding a 2 unit softmax dense layer as we have just 2 classes to predict i.e. foreground or background. After that we are compiling the model using Adam optimizer with learning rate of 0.001. We are using categorical_crossentropy as loss since the output of the model is categorical. Finally the summary of the model will is printed using model_final.summary(). The image of summary is attached below.

How to build confidence from scratch

After creating the model now we need to split the dataset into train and test set. Before that we need to one-hot encode the label. For that we are using MyLabelBinarizer() and encoding the dataset. Then we are splitting the dataset using train_test_split from sklearn. We are keeping 10% of the dataset as test set and 90% as training set.

Now we will use Keras ImageDataGenerator to pass the dataset to the model. We will do some augmentation on the dataset like horizontal flip, vertical flip and rotation to increase the dataset.

Now we start the training of the model using fit_generator.

Now once we have created the model. We need to do prediction on that model. For that we need to follow the steps mentioned below :

  1. pass the image from selective search.
  2. pass all the result of the selective search to the model as input using model_final.predict(img).
  3. If the output of the model says the region to be a foreground image (i.e. airplane image) and if the confidence is above the defined threshold then create bounding box on the original image on the coordinate of the proposed region.

How to build confidence from scratch

As you can see above we created box on the proposed region in which the accuracy of the model was above 0.70. In this way we can do localisation on an image and perform object detection using R-CNN. This is how we implement an R-CNN architecture from scratch using keras.

You can get the fully implemented R-CNN from the link provided below.

TLDR: it’s actually a lot of fun

How to build confidence from scratch

After 7 years working as Senior Data Manager at Criteo and as Head of Data at Payfit, and after interviewing 200+ data leaders for user research, I am starting to have a good overview of data stacks in action. So, by popular demand, I’m dropping here and there some advice on the trends I observed.

Earlier in March, I had two different calls: one from a former colleague, now head of data at Swile, and one from a friend, now head of data at Cajoo. Both had taken a new job and had to build a complete data stack, from scratch! I assume this could interest others. Here is the piece of advice I gave them.

Before we start, here is a Decision Matrix that you can use for benchmark purposes:

  • Ease of Use
  • Integration in Cloud environment
  • Community & Documentation
  • Governance Capabilities
  • Pricing

To keep things simple, we’ll just follow the data, from source to reporting.

Where you store your data for analytics needs

How to build confidence from scratch

My recommendation is simple:

  • If your dev stack runs on Google Cloud, then go for BigQuery (BQ)
  • If your dev stack runs on AWS, then go for Snowflake (SF)

Here are a few reasons.

  1. Redshift was indeed the first big player on the Cloud Data Warehouse market, but it means they’ve made mistakes that followers could avoid, and they haven’t changed much for the last few years.
  2. Redshift has a poor UI/UX, especially for end-users (data consumers).
  3. BigQuery and Snowflake are quite similar in terms of features and pricing models (based on usage: BQ bills you by scanned data, Snowflake bills you by query time). A slight difference is that the first one is stronger when the whole stack is run on Google Cloud while the second is slightly more “Analytics” focused, making it a perfect match for AWS users.

Snowflake is heading towards being a full data platform (multi-cloud, Snowpipe, jobs, data share, python/js functions) with a friendly user interface.

BigQuery’s strength is its integration within the Google Cloud systems: read/write from GCS, IAM rights management, billing, Google Spreadsheets native integration, …)

Get Data in your Data Warehouse

How to build confidence from scratch

For data originating from a SaaS, use StitchData or Fivetran. These two companies do a great job at maintaining these data dumps for their thousands of clients, and their pricing is linear as well as predictable. The sources they can retrieve data from is numerous, check these here and here.

You may want to cherry-pick some tables to ingest yourself, for frequency reasons or whatever. Make sure to leverage the numerous open-source taps made available here.

Want a mix between the fully managed and the fully homemade? Check Airbyte. You’ll have to host it but it comes with the necessary bunch of features, sources, and destinations.

Segment provides similar features, depending on the plan you’re on. But focuses more on event tracking, it’s a must-have to sync your marketing campaigns with user activity. Think of Segment as the big ears listening to what is happening on your website/app. It also demands an ongoing tagging plan. An alternative is Contentsquare which does not integrate that well with other data sources but does not require a tagging plan

Do not worry, there is still plenty of DE work to do: you’ve got ingestion pipelines to build for all your production data. If your PROD is in NoSQL (such as Mongo), then you’ve got the transformation to do before ingesting the data in your data warehouse. If your PROD is already in a SQL format, then you can dump all needed data in your analytics warehouse, and directly move on to the next paragraph

From raw data to model/reports ready

How to build confidence from scratch

First things first, ETL is dead, long live ELT (note the L now in the middle). In recent years, storage costs decreased to a point ( Run job 1 then run job 2

How to build confidence from scratch

The market standard for scheduling really boils down to Airflow, the question is which deployment set up you want? You can go for:

  • Self-Managed: dockerized airflow
  • Managed: AWS version /GCP Version
  • Fully-Managed: Astronomer

Astronomer helps you get off the ground faster. But there is a cost for that…

Make your shiny dashboards

How to build confidence from scratch

This one is tough, as competition is fierce within this segment. This will also be the only part your business users will see, out of the whole stack you are building. Strong options are Tableau, Looker, or Metabase. I know that there are a lot of other options out there, that’s just my opinion

I’ll make a dedicated article on the matter, but to start, go for Metabase. First, on the data Viz side, it’s simple and straightforward, it takes a few minutes to go from a table to a dashboard. Keep in mind that for a while your dashboards will be simple, as you need to educate the different teams. Oh, and it’s free as long as you host it yourself.

Find, understand and use data faster

How to build confidence from scratch

Do you think that data discovery is only for people with too much data or many people? Did you know that after a few data dumps from Stitch or Segment, you’ll already have hundreds of tables?

On top of that, I’m quite sure that the first data analyst or engineer you’ll hire will make their own data documentation on a google doc or else. Wouldn’t it be better to have that info accessible to everyone and especially to the second hire?

At Castor, we provide just that!

How to build confidence from scratch

Castor is a data documentation tool for the Notion-Figma-Slack generation. Or data-wise, for the Fivetran-Looker-Snowflake-DBT aficionados. We designed our catalog to be easy to use, automated, delightful, and friendly.

Want to check it out? Reach out to us and we will show you a demo.

Classification and object detection are the main parts of computer vision. Classification is finding what is in an image and object detection and localisation is finding where is that object in that image. Detection is a more complex problem to solve as we need to find the coordinates of the object in an image.

To Solve this problem R-CNN was introduced by Ross Girshick, Jeff Donahue, Trevor Darrell and Jitendra Malik in 2014. R-CNN stands for Regions with CNN. In R-CNN instead of running classification on huge number of regions we pass the image through selective search and select first 2000 region proposal from the result and run classification on that. In this way instead of classifying huge number of regions we need to just classify first 2000 regions. This makes this algorithm fast compared to previous techniques of object detection. There are 4 steps in R-CNN. They are as follows :-

  1. Pass the image through selective search and generate region proposal.
  2. Calculate IOU (intersection over union) on proposed region with ground truth data and add label to the proposed regions.
  3. Do transfer learning using the proposed regions with the labels.
  4. Pass the test image to selective search and then pass the first 2000 proposed regions from the trained model and predict the class of those regions.

How to build confidence from scratch

I am going to implement full R-CNN from scratch in Keras using Airplane data-set from http://www.escience.cn/people/JunweiHan/NWPU-RESISC45.html . To get the annotated data-set you can download it from link below. The code for implemented RCNN can also be found in the below mentioned repository.

Once you have downloaded the dataset you can proceed with the steps written below.

First step is to import all the libraries which will be needed to implement R-CNN. We need cv2 to perform selective search on the images. To use selective search we need to download opencv-contrib-python. To download that just run pip install opencv-contrib-python in the terminal and install it from pypi.

After downloading opencv-contrib we need to initialise selective search. For that we have added the above step.

Now we are initialising the function to calculate IOU (Intersection Over Union) of the ground truth box from the box computed by selective search. To understand more about calculating IOU you can refer to the link below.

How to build confidence from scratch

The above code is pre-processing and creating the data-set to pass to the model. As in this case we can have 2 classes. These classes are that whether the proposed region can be a foreground (i.e. Airplane) or a background. So we will set the label of foreground (i.e. Airplane) as 1 and the label of background as 0. The following steps are being performed in the above code block.

  1. Loop over the image folder and set each image one by one as the base for selective search using code ss.setBaseImage(image)
  2. Initialising fast selective search and getting proposed regions using using code ss.switchToSelectiveSearchFast() and ssresults = ss.process()
  3. Iterating over all the first 2000 results passed by selective search and calculating IOU of the proposed region and annotated region using the get_iou() function created above.
  4. Now as one image can many negative sample (i.e. background) and just some positive sample (i.e. airplane) so we need to make sure that we have good proportion of both positive and negative sample to train our model. Therefore we have set that we will collect maximum of 30 negative sample (i.e. background) and positive sample (i.e. airplane) from one image.

After running the above code snippet our training data will be ready. List train_images=[] will contain all the images and train_labels=[] will contain all the labels marking airplane images as 1 and non airplane images (i.e. background images) as 0.

How to build confidence from scratch

After completing the process of creating the dataset we will convert the array to numpy array so that we can traverse it easily and pass the datatset to the model in an efficient way.

Now we will do transfer learning on the imagenet weight. We will import VGG16 model and also put the imagenet weight in the model. To learn more about transfer learning you can refer to the article on link below.

In this part in the loop we are freezing the first 15 layers of the model. After that we are taking out the second last layer of the model and then adding a 2 unit softmax dense layer as we have just 2 classes to predict i.e. foreground or background. After that we are compiling the model using Adam optimizer with learning rate of 0.001. We are using categorical_crossentropy as loss since the output of the model is categorical. Finally the summary of the model will is printed using model_final.summary(). The image of summary is attached below.

How to build confidence from scratch

After creating the model now we need to split the dataset into train and test set. Before that we need to one-hot encode the label. For that we are using MyLabelBinarizer() and encoding the dataset. Then we are splitting the dataset using train_test_split from sklearn. We are keeping 10% of the dataset as test set and 90% as training set.

Now we will use Keras ImageDataGenerator to pass the dataset to the model. We will do some augmentation on the dataset like horizontal flip, vertical flip and rotation to increase the dataset.

Now we start the training of the model using fit_generator.

Now once we have created the model. We need to do prediction on that model. For that we need to follow the steps mentioned below :

  1. pass the image from selective search.
  2. pass all the result of the selective search to the model as input using model_final.predict(img).
  3. If the output of the model says the region to be a foreground image (i.e. airplane image) and if the confidence is above the defined threshold then create bounding box on the original image on the coordinate of the proposed region.

How to build confidence from scratch

As you can see above we created box on the proposed region in which the accuracy of the model was above 0.70. In this way we can do localisation on an image and perform object detection using R-CNN. This is how we implement an R-CNN architecture from scratch using keras.

You can get the fully implemented R-CNN from the link provided below.

17 simple suggestions for building confidence and self-esteem.

Key points

  • Low self-esteem results from traumatic childhood experiences and is made worse by negative life events.
  • Those with low self-esteem see themselves as powerless over their environment and often develop mental disorders.
  • Simple ways to boost one’s self-esteem include exercise, listing one’s achievements, and setting realistic daily goals.

[Post revised on 28 April 2020.]

How to build confidence from scratch

Low self-esteem can be deeply rooted, with origins in traumatic childhood experiences such as prolonged separation from parent figures, neglect, or emotional, physical, or sexual abuse.

In later life, self-esteem can be undermined by ill health, negative life events such as losing a job or getting divorced, deficient or frustrating relationships, and a general sense of lack of control.

This sense of lack of control may be especially marked in victims of emotional, physical, or sexual abuse, or victims of discrimination on the grounds of religion, culture, race, sex, or sexual orientation.

The relationship between low self-esteem and mental disorder and mental distress is very complex. Low self-esteem predisposes to mental disorder, which in turn knocks self-esteem. In some cases, low self-esteem is in itself a cardinal feature of mental disorder, especially depression.

People with low self-esteem tend to see the world as a hostile place and themselves as its victim. As a result, they are reluctant to express and assert themselves, miss out on experiences and opportunities, and feel powerless to change things.

All this lowers their self-esteem still further, sucking them into a downward spiral.

Simple ways to build self-esteem

If you feel that you suffer from poor self-esteem, there are a number of simple things that you can do to boost yourself and, hopefully, break out of the downward spiral.

You may already be doing some of these things, and you certainly don’t need to do them all. Just do the ones that you feel most comfortable with.

1. Make two lists: one of your strengths and one of your achievements. Try to get a supportive friend or relative to help you with these lists, as people with low mood are not usually in the most objective frame of mind. Keep the lists in a safe place and read through them every morning.

2. Think positively about yourself. Remind yourself that, despite your problems, you are a unique, special, and valuable person, and that you deserve to feel good about yourself. You are, after all, a miracle of consciousness, the consciousness of the universe. Identify and challenge any negative thoughts about yourself such as ‘I’m a loser’, ‘I never do anything right’, and ‘No one really likes me’.

3. Pay special attention to your personal hygiene: Take a shower, brush your hair, trim your nails, and so on.

4. Wear clean clothes that make you feel good about yourself. All things being equal, wear an ironed shirt rather than a crumpled T-shirt, you get the idea.

5. Eat good food as part of a healthy, balanced diet. Make meals a special time, even if you are eating alone. Turn off the TV, set the table, light a candle, and make a moment to feel grateful.

6. Exercise regularly. Go for a walk every day, even if it is cold or rainy, and take more vigorous exercise (exercise that makes you sweat) two or three times a week.

7. Ensure that you’re getting enough sleep. See my post “Better Sleep in 10 Simple Steps.”

8. Reduce your stress levels. If possible, agree with a friend or relative that you will take turns to massage each other on a regular basis. For other suggestions, see my post ” Managing Stress .”

9. Make your living space clean, comfortable, and attractive. Whenever I clean my windows or just water my plants, I seem to feel much better. Display items that remind you of your achievements and the special times and people in your life.

10. Do more of the things that you enjoy. Go ahead and spoil yourself. Do at least one thing that you enjoy every day.

11. Get artistic. Activities like poetry, music, and dance, among many others, enable you to express and explore your emotions, interact positively with others, and reduce your levels of stress. You might even impress yourself! Find a class through your local adult education service or community centre.

12. Set yourself a challenge that you can realistically complete. For example, take up yoga, learn to sing, or throw a dinner party for some friends. Just go for it!

13. Do some of the things that you have been putting off, such as filing the paperwork, repainting the kitchen, or clearing out the garden.

14. Be nice to people, and do nice things for them. Strike up a conversation with the postman or shopkeeper, invite a neighbour round for tea, visit a friend who is sick, get involved with a local charity… Putting a smile on someone’s face is bound to put one on yours.

15. Get others on board. Tell your friends and relatives what you are going through and ask for their advice and support. Perhaps they too have similar problems, in which case you might be able to form a support group. Don’t be shy or reserved: most people want to help!

16. Spend more time with those you hold near and dear. At the same time, try to enlarge your social circle by making an effort to meet and befriend people. Befriending people can take months and years, so don’t necessarily expect immediate results.

17. Avoid people and places that treat you badly or make you feel bad about yourself. This could mean being more assertive. If assertiveness is a problem for you, ask a health professional about assertiveness training.

Finally, remember those wise words of Lao Tzu: Health is the greatest possession. Contentment is the greatest treasure. Confidence is the greatest friend.

This article was co-authored by Jessica Elliott, ACC, CEC. Jessica Elliott is a Certified Executive Coach and multi-passionate entrepreneur. She’s the founder of LIFETOX, where she hosts mindful experiences and retreats, and J Elliott Coaching, which she provides executive consulting for professionals, teams, and organizations. Jessica has had over fifteen years experience as an entrepreneur and over five years of executive coaching experience. She received her ACC (Associate Certified Coach) accreditation through the International Coaching Federation (ICF) and her CEC (Certified Executive Coach) accreditation through Royal Roads University.

There are 8 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

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There isn’t really such a thing as having an objectively good personality. Everyone likes different types of people. The key is building a personality that you can feel proud of and confident in. You want a personality that will attract the type of people that you like. Developing your personality will take time and consistent effort, just like making any other major lifestyle change. You will need to form new beliefs over time, and put those beliefs into action until they become habits. [1] X Research source

made from scratch

make (something) from scratch

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Link to this page:

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • make sick
  • make skin
  • make small talk
  • make so bold (as to do something)
  • make some sense (out) of (something)
  • make somebody sick
  • make somebody’s acquaintance
  • make somebody’s blood boil
  • make somebody’s blood run cold
  • make somebody’s day
  • make somebody’s hackles rise
  • make somebody’s hair curl
  • make somebody’s life a misery
  • make somebody’s mouth water
  • make somebody’s toes curl
  • make someone
  • make someone feel small
  • make someone look good
  • make someone’s day
  • make someone’s flesh creep
  • make someone’s hackles rise
  • make someone’s hair curl
  • make someone’s hair stand on end
  • make someone’s mouth water
  • make someone’s toes curl
  • make something from scratch
  • make something of
  • make something of (one’s) life
  • make something of (oneself)
  • make something of it
  • make something of whole cloth
  • make something of yourself
  • make something stick
  • make something to measure
  • make something worth somebody’s while
  • make sport of (someone or something)
  • make stick
  • make strange
  • make strange (with one)
  • make strange bedfellows
  • make sure
  • make sure of (something)
  • make that (something)
  • make the acquaintance of (someone)
  • make the arrangements
  • make the beast with two backs
  • make the bed
  • make the bed (up)
  • make the best of
  • make the best of (something)
  • make the best of a bad bargain
  • make someone’s head swim
  • make someone’s jaw drop
  • make someone’s life a misery
  • make someone’s marble good
  • make someone’s money stretch
  • make someone’s mouth water
  • make someone’s number
  • make someone’s own luck
  • make someone’s pitch
  • make someone’s pitch for
  • make someone’s position clear
  • make someone’s skin crawl
  • make someone’s teeth itch
  • make someone’s toes curl
  • make someone’s way along
  • make someone’s way back
  • make someone’s way through
  • make someone’s way through something
  • make something
  • make something a hit
  • make something a household name
  • make something a practice
  • make something against
  • make something by your own fair hand
  • make something clear
  • make something clear to
  • Make Something Cool Every Day
  • make something count
  • make something crystal clear, to
  • make something from
  • make something from scratch
  • make something from scratch, to
  • make something good
  • make something interesting
  • make something into a circus
  • make something into a circus, to
  • make something jump
  • make something mad
  • make something mad at
  • make something mad at someone
  • make something mad at something
  • make something of
  • make something of
  • make something of
  • make something of
  • make something of
  • make something of (one’s) life
  • make something of (oneself)
  • make something of her life
  • make something of herself
  • make something of himself
  • make something of his life
  • make something of it
  • make something of life
  • make something of my life
  • make something of myself
  • make something of one’s life
  • make something of oneself
  • make something of our lives
  • make something of ourselves
  • make something of their lives
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from scratch

*from scratch

.) We made the cake from scratch, using no prepared ingredients. I didn’t have a ladder, so I made one from scratch.

from scratch

from scratch

from scratch

do something from ˈscratch

from scratch

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  • Facebook
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  • from here till next Tuesday
  • from here to eternity
  • from here to Sunday
  • from hunger
  • from jump street
  • from left field
  • from memory
  • from Missouri
  • from Missouri, I’m
  • from my cold, dead hands
  • from my perspective
  • from nature
  • from near and far
  • from now on
  • from now until doomsday
  • from nowhere
  • from on high
  • from one day to the next
  • from one extreme to the other
  • from one moment to the next
  • from overseas
  • from pillar to post
  • from point A to point B
  • from post to pillar
  • from rags to riches
  • from scratch
  • from sea to shining sea
  • from side to side
  • from soda to hock
  • from soup to nuts
  • from start to finish
  • from stem to stern
  • from strength to strength
  • from that day/time forth
  • from the
  • from the bottom of (one’s) heart
  • from the bottom of heart
  • from the bottom of my heart
  • from the bottom of one’s heart
  • from the bottom of your heart
  • from the bowels of the Earth
  • from the corner of (one’s) eye
  • from the cradle to the grave
  • from the dead
  • from the Department of the Bleeding Obvious
  • from the depths of (one’s) heart
  • from the ends of the earth
  • from the face of the earth
  • from the first
  • from the floor
  • from the four corners of the earth
  • from our perspective
  • from our point of view
  • From Outer Space
  • from overseas
  • From Paris With Love
  • From Parts Unknown
  • From Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
  • from perspective
  • From Pieces to Weight
  • from pillar to post
  • from pillar to post
  • from pillar to post
  • from pillar to post
  • from pillar to post
  • From Point A to Point B
  • from point of view
  • from post to pillar
  • From Prada to Nada
  • from rags to riches
  • from rags to riches
  • from rags to riches
  • from rags to riches
  • from rags to riches
  • From Reality to Fiction A Farewell to Arms
  • From Reality to Fiction A Farewell to Arms
  • From Reality to Fiction A Farewell to Arms
  • From Receipt of Order
  • From Revolution to Reconstruction
  • From Ritual to Romance
  • From Russia with Love
  • from scratch
  • from scratch, make
  • From Sea to Shining Sea
  • From Segregation to Civil Rights
  • from side to side
  • from soda to hock
  • from somebody’s heart
  • from somebody’s lips to God’s ear
  • from somebody’s lips to God’s ears
  • from somebody’s mouth to God’s ear
  • from somebody’s mouth to God’s ears
  • from somebody’s perspective
  • from somebody’s point of view
  • from someone’s heart
  • from someone’s lips to God’s ear
  • from someone’s lips to God’s ears
  • from someone’s mouth to God’s ear
  • from someone’s mouth to God’s ears
  • from someone’s perspective
  • from someone’s point of view
  • From Somewhere Else
  • From Sound to Image
  • From Sound to Image
  • From Sound to Image
  • From Soup to Nuts
  • from start to finish
  • from start to finish
  • from start to finish
  • from stem to stern
  • from stem to stern
  • from stem to stern
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A simple practice can prime your brain for confidence and achievement.

How to build confidence from scratch

You probably keep a to-do list, a running tally of the things you want to accomplish. You may also take the time to write down your goals for the coming day, or week, or month. But here’s something you should do but probably don’t: End every evening by writing down the best things you did that day.

I had never thought about doing anything like this until I came across this New York Times piece about accepting compliments, especially from yourself. It doesn’t sound like much of a practice and it only takes a few minutes so it may be hard to see why the simple act of writing down a few small tasks — fed the cat, hugged my kid, helped solve someone’s problem at work, made dinner — could be a powerful self-improvement tool. And yet, it is.

If you’re a good boss, you already know that praising people about their efforts and accomplishments is one of the most powerful ways there is to motivate them to an even more outstanding performance. It turns out that the same principle applies to the praise you give yourself. This is counter-intuitive for a lot of people, including me. You are likely more are accustomed to motivating yourself by basically yelling at yourself like a drill sergeant. “Get up off the couch, turn off the TV and go work out you lazy idiot! What’s wrong with you? If you don’t get moving, you’ll never amount to anything!”

Most of us talk to ourselves this way all the time. It may feel very unnatural to tell ourselves something like, “You work so hard, and you did such a good job today. I’m proud of you.” And yet, just like your employees, that’s exactly what you need to hear from yourself to stay motivated. In fact, Teresa Amabile, a Harvard Business School professor and co-author of The Progress Principle told the Times that the praise we give ourselves may be the most powerful praise there is. And it’s not so much the huge celebrations we hold when we finish an important project or break a record that matter. People derive the most benefit from making small achievements and then pausing to reflect on them.

What did I do right today?

The Times suggests keeping score of your small achievements whatever way works best for you, either jotting down things you’ve gotten done throughout the day or filling in a spreadsheet or taking a few minutes to write things down at the end of the day. But if you can do it, I recommend the last of these options because focusing your attention on your own small successes right before going to sleep will have a powerfully positive effect on your unconscious mind. That’s especially true if, like me, you tend to start every day hoping to get more done than is probably humanly possible, and then end every day dwelling on all the things you planned to accomplish but didn’t.

So, at the end of the night, grab your journal or a piece of paper or even your smartphone and ask yourself this question — write it at the top of the page if you like: “What did I do right today?”

Now, if you’re anything like me, you’ll be tempted to write things like this: “I made some progress on that project but not as much as I hoped. I did take a walk today, but it wasn’t as long as it could have been, and then afterward I ate too many donut holes.”

It’s important to resist that temptation to compare what you actually did with what you think you should have done, or balance what you got right with what you got wrong. Nope, we’re only looking for the positive. And small accomplishments are at least as important as big ones. So stifle your human instinct to focus on the negative and only write down the good things. Then do it again tomorrow, and again the next day. Writing down what you’re proud of — and that you’re proud of those things — will give you a small mental reward. That, in turn, will make you more willing to make the same effort tomorrow, or maybe even a little bit more.

The point of this practice is to focus on your daily small accomplishments to build your confidence and motivation to build on those successes. It will also provide a record. You may be surprised, in a year or two, when you come back and review your daily writings just how far you’ve come.

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Gain confidence in your presentations by following these tips

Gain confidence in your presentations by following these tips

For most of us, effective public speaking requires a bit of discipline, preparation, and practice. These suggestions will help you develop your delivery skills and overcome presentation jitters.

This article is also available as a PDF download.

By D. Keith Robinson

Public speaking can be very stressful. I know that whenever
I get up in front of a crowd I go through a panic moment. It takes a lot of
discipline, practice, and preparation to put on a good presentation and even
knowing what you need to know can be hard.

A year or so ago, I wrote on the subject of first-time speaking.
Since that time, I’ve been able to use many of those tips as well as some new
tricks to help get myself ready for speaking engagements. I also had a chance
to spend time with a speaking coach, which helped more than I’d have ever
guessed.

Now when I’m speaking, while not 100 percent comfortable, I
do feel much better. I’m able to make it more fun for me, and I think I
pass along that good feeling a bit more to my audience. I’ve got several useful
tips, tricks, and resources I hope will help some of you. These things should
help whether you’re speaking at a large conference, giving a small internal presentation
to you coworkers or classmates, or giving a sales pitch. They’re pretty
universal.

Mental and physical preparation before your presentation

I’ve found that the more prepared I am, the more confident I
feel. This makes for a better presentation. As you get comfortable speaking,
you’ll naturally feel more confident and the need to prepare (and time it
takes) will not be so important. For newer and first-time speakers, I think you
should spend as much time as you can getting ready. Well, don’t make yourself
crazy; just make sure you know and feel comfortable with your material and
practice a few times.

If you’ve never spoken before, a meeting with a speech coach
can really help. They talk with you and get an idea of your style and then offer
some specific advice on how to address the crowd, what your particular
problems might be, and more. For example, when I went I was told:

  • Speak slower.
  • Talk to individuals in the crowd.
  • Think before you speak. Take pauses.

These things were (and still are)
very, very helpful for me to remember when I’m speaking. Going over them before
I get up there reminds me and helps me be more calm and confident.

A few other ways to prepare yourself:

  • Drink lots of water.
  • Get a good night’s sleep.
  • Avoid the urge to go out drinking the night
    before. If you do, moderate yourself. (Especially if you’re at SXSW.)
  • Eat.
  • Breathe.
  • Visualize a positive outcome.
  • Hang out with the other speakers (if there are
    any) and ask them questions and for advice. This always helps me as they will
    usually build you up.

Preparing your support materials

The key to preparing your actual presentation is to remember
that less is more. If you want to share your information with people who
couldn’t be there, try writing an article. Even detailed presentations have
something missing. A few common, and good to know, guidelines to a good
presentation:

  • Keep text to a minimum. No more than five bullet
    points per slide. If you can keep them to one core idea, that’s better.
    People will tend to read this stuff and not pay attention to what you’re
    saying.
  • Check the contrast and font size. Make sure that
    if you have text on the screen, people can read it.
  • Use pictures to get your idea across. They’re
    easier to remember, less distracting, and make more impact. Have stories ready
    and use imagery to set the backdrop.
  • Avoid complicated charts and graphs; they’re
    hard for your audience to follow. Keep visual ideas very simple.
  • Check the resolution of your presentation. Maybe
    go with 800 x 600 to be safe. I don’t know how many times I’ve seen slides that
    don’t fit on the screen. You never know for sure how it’s going to work out
    when you get things set up if you don’t have full control over the environment.
  • Have simple-to-follow notes to go along with
    your slides and major talking points. They should serve as a reminder, not
    something for you to read from.
  • Prepare more than you can speak to, but also be
    prepared to get cut short. Time flies up there.

Giving the presentation

Although you don’t want to spend too much time while in the
midst of your presentation thinking about what to say or do, there are a few
things you should remember when speaking:

  • Think positive.
  • Tell stories. Stories will get your idea across
    much better than charts and graphs and numbers. They also have the added
    benefit of helping to engage your audience.
  • Don’t read your slides. They should support what
    you are saying, not be what you are saying. The same goes for your
    notes.
  • Keep your intro short and strong. People want to
    know who you are, but they also want to get into the meat of your talk. A
    quick, solid, and clear intro is better than a meandering joke or list of
    accomplishments any day. Chances are, most people in the audience know a bit
    about you already.
  • Keep it slow and steady. Pause when you need to
    take a breath; you’ll think better.
  • Don’t agonize over mistakes, and don’t say your
    sorry. Keep confident and if you mess up, move on.
  • Pause to let strong ideas sink in. This can be
    hard to remember, but your audience needs time to absorb and take breaks too!
  • Smile, joke, and laugh if appropriate. A little
    humor can go a long way, but don’t overdo it.
  • Learn from your mistakes. I know that I learn a
    little every time I get up and speak.
  • End strong. Make your finally crisp, clean, and
    powerful.
  • Be prepared for interruptions and questions. If
    you are doing well, you’ll have lots of questions.

I hope this stuff helps some of
you. I know that the advice I’ve been given over the years has helped me quite
a bit. I’m still not a great speaker, but I’m getting better and I sure as heck
feel more comfortable about it than I used to–which to me is more than half the
battle.

D. Keith Robinson
is a writer, designer, artist, and publisher living in Seattle. He’s been a Web
professional for nearly 10 years, and his career has included work with Boeing,
Microsoft, and Sony. His Getting To Done column appears on Lifehacker.

  • Keywords:design, elementary, Collaboration, STEM, reflection, design journal, See Inside the Classroom

At Sinclair Elementary School, a communications-focused /STEM magnet school in Houston, TX, all 560 K-12 students in Bradley Quentin’s STEM Lab are building confidence with creative computing. After seeing some of his students’ creations on Twitter, we asked Bradley if he could give us a look inside his practice.

From Tech to Tool

Bradley found out about Scratch when he was teaching third grade. His third graders loved making the Scratch cat move, meow, and spin in endless circles. At first, Bradley saw Scratch “as a fun add-on to the computer science lessons my student were doing in Code.org.” When Bradley moved to his new role as a STEM lab teacher, he chose to use Scratch and Scratch Jr. as primary components of his curriculum.

Over time, Bradley came to see Scratch as a tool learners can use to express themselves. “It’s in league with your crayons and colored pencils and hot glue gun and all that. His newfound perception led to different ways of incorporating Scratch in the classroom. “I used to say things like ‘now we’re going to do this thing in Scratch,’ but now I say things like ‘now we’re going to do this project.’ Students know that Scratch is one of the things they can use—and they often jump to it as a tool.”
How to build confidence from scratch

But being creative can be a challenge, especially when students have been socialized towards getting the right answer. Bradley discovered that many students struggled with open-ended or multiple solution tasks during his first year as the STEM lab teacher. He decided to intervene by incorporating more self-directed, interest-driven activities.

And it’s working. Over time, students in Bradley’s class are becoming more sure of themselves as creators, and it’s showing in the questions they ask. “They’re moving from questions like, ‘Is it supposed to be like this?’ to ‘How do I make this thing I want to do happen?’”

Thinking Like Designers

With more autonomy as makers, students are empowered to think like designers, embracing the process of brainstorming, planning, iterating, and reflecting. “I stress to the students throughout the year that success in the lab is not only about the final product, but the process as well.” And Bradley supports this approach through scaffolds and protocols such as design journals for brainstorming and planning, group critiques for iterating, and rubrics and Google forms for reflecting. At the end of each unit, this constellation of documentation provides ample information for assessment—both self-assessment and grading.

How to build confidence from scratchHow to build confidence from scratch

In their journals, students make drawings and diagrams to plan their projects.

How to build confidence from scratch

For a recent 4th grade biography project on influential women, students used Scratch and Makey Makey to create an interactive display, like this project on Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

How to build confidence from scratch

Example Google Form prompts from an Elizabeth Cady Stanton project.

A Scratch Approach to the Classroom

After working through a design challenge to create sculptures out of recycled stuff, students write museum tags describing their work, share their work on a gallery shelf, and talk about their work in a studio-like critique. These processes, which mirror the creative and reflective process in the Scratch online community, have become routine in Bradley’s classroom,

Bradley’s understanding of Scratch as not only a digital platform—but a way of thinking—has engendered a classroom environment where creative possibility abounds.

To read more about Bradley’s STEM lab, check out his blog: Mr. Quentin’s Center for Advanced Awesomeness

Andrew Chalkley
writes on May 29, 2014

Starting out in the professional development arena is pretty daunting. I’m self-taught and I don’t have a degree. Broaching my first full time position was pretty scary. What would the interviewer think? I thought I knew how to develop coding skills, but did I really? The truth is I was, but I wish I knew what I knew now because I’d be more confident. Here are five tips to improve your coding skills and confidence, whether it’s your first or fiftieth job position.

For additional tips on building confidence, check out this blog post about imposter syndrome.

1. Practice, Practice, Practice

Firstly you need to build your own confidence in your own abilities. You can only go so far following along with tutorials online. You need to build something of your own to improve your coding skills. In many professional settings you don’t want to reinvent the wheel, but it can be helpful for a learning exercise. Build your own blog in PHP, build a JavaScript plugin, get a feel for how these things work, so you’ll have the confidence using pre-packaged applications and plugins in your job. Fail fast and often.

Don’t feel obligated to finishing your practice projects if you’ve felt you’ve learnt what you wanted to—things can get boring if your goal of learning a particular thing has already been accomplished.

2. Create a Project & Release It

Now you’ve practiced, it’s time to actually use your knowledge and create a project and share it with the world.

Is it a web site? Is it a mobile app? Is it a Ruby Gem? Seeing people use your code in the real world gives you more confidence. For my first project I built a Ruby Gem, not because I had any real use for it but because I saw it didn’t exist yet. I released it and didn’t expect anything of it. When I got a tweet thanking me for it and it was being used in a production site it gave me a great confidence boost.

3. Contribute on Github

Contributing to other Open Source projects on Github can be a great way to get additional experience and confidence. You can learn from other’s code and feedback on your commits.

Your contributions don’t even have to be in code. You can modify a wiki or update documentation. This shows you understand coding skills and can articulate how to use them!

4. Give a Talk at a Meet Up

I’ve given talks at meet ups, I’ve trained in corporate settings, and released courses on Treehouse. And you know what? Every time I’ve felt a little scared and inadequate to the task. But almost every time I’ve done it and put myself out there, I’ve found that my feelings of inadequacy were unjustified. After giving the talk, even on something like “What I learned from trying out ”, I’ve found that a lot of people are less experienced. Why are they there in the first place listening to you? You’ve done something they haven’t. You’ve just become an instant expert and valuable resource to them.

5. Talk to Everyone

Finally, when you talk to people about their experiences coding you’ll soon find out that they have the same feelings of doubt and inadequacy. Just knowing you’re not alone can give you the confidence to move forward in your development career.

If you’re ready to pursue a career in iOS, JavaScript, Front End or Python software development, then check out Treehouse’s Techdegree program — which provides students with the skills, support and portfolio of a job-ready professional developer in as little as three months. You can try TD out today with our free seven-day trial,

I started helping my parents in the kitchen when I was about five years old. From baking cookies with my mom to making pancakes with my dad, if there was something tasty getting made, I was there lending a hand. As soon as I learned to read, I started reading recipes and cooking on my own. And by the time I was about twelve years old I was making pies and fudge by myself. Now my oldest son is getting to the age that he can start working in the kitchen too and I can’t wait to help him learn how to cook his own culinary creations!

How to build confidence from scratchSo when I was recently offered the chance to review a new cooking book for kids, Starting from Scratch: What You Should Know About Food and Cooking by Sarah Elton and published by OwlKids Books, the timing couldn’t have been better. This book is no simple compilation of kid-friendly recipes…it is a complete and incredibly detailed guide to cooking that breaks down the process piece by piece so that children can feel confident in the kitchen even without a recipe. I sat down to read through it before giving it to Zackary and I was so impressed by how much information the book contained.

The book starts off with a chapter on taste, followed by a chapter that explains different cuisines. From there, the book explores the science behind cooking, the math concepts needed for recipes and the preparation process. I loved the idea of broadening a child’s mind about what food can be through explanations that included a look at the science behind food as well as an exploration of food geography and basic health and safety concepts.

My personal favourite chapter was called How to Make a Meal, and looked at the step-by-step process of actually creating a meal from start to finish without using a recipe. By explaining the logic behind making a dish, it took kids beyond merely following step-by-step instructions so that they could get creative and inventive with food. It’s an aspect of cooking that most books for children don’t explore, but it’s a hugely important one in order to create a confident cook. Not every great meal needs to be created by following a recipe!

If you have a child that’s ready to gain some kitchen confidence, you’re in luck! OwlKids Books is very generously offering one lucky Mommy Kat and Kids reader their own copy of Starting from Scratch, a $20 value! To enter to win, just leave a blog comment about which junior chef would be getting this book if you won!

Zackary has been really enjoying reading through Starting from Scratch and as he’s always had a passion for science, he is especially interested in some of the more scientific aspects of cookery such as the use of yeast and baking powder in baking and the concept of starches converting to sugars during toasting. I love that he’s getting a solid knowledge of cooking instead of just following steps in a recipe! To help your child work in the kitchen with confidence, Starting from Scratch by Sarah Elton is a great choice. Check it out and help your child develop cooking skills that he’ll use his entire life!
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README.md

How to create an OS from scratch!

I have always wanted to learn how to make an OS from scratch. In college I was taught how to implement advanced features (pagination, semaphores, memory management, etc) but:

  • I never got to start from my own boot sector
  • College is hard so I don’t remember most of it.
  • I’m fed up with people who think that reading an already existing kernel, even if small, is a good idea to learn operating systems.

Inspired by this document and the OSDev wiki, I’ll try to make short step-by-step READMEs and code samples for anybody to follow. Honestly, this tutorial is basically the first document but split into smaller pieces and without the theory.

  • This course is a code tutorial aimed at people who are comfortable with low level computing. For example, programmers who have curiosity on how an OS works but don’t have the time or willpower to start reading the Linux kernel top to bottom.
  • There is little theory. Yes, this is a feature. Google is your theory lecturer. Once you pass college, excessive theory is worse than no theory because it makes things seem more difficult than they really are.
  • The lessons are tiny and may take 5-15 minutes to complete. Trust me and trust yourself. You can do it!

How to use this tutorial

Start with the first folder and go down in order. They build on previous code, so if you jump right to folder 05 and don’t know why there is a mov ah, 0x0e , it’s because you missed lecture 02. Really, just go in order. You can always skip stuff you already know.

Open the README and read the first line, which details the concepts you should be familiar with before reading the code. Google concepts you are not familiar with. The second line states the goals for each lesson. Read them, because they explain why we do what we do. The “why” is as important as the “how”.

Read the rest of the README. It is very concise.

(Optional) Try to write the code files by yourself after reading the README.

Look at the code examples. They are extremely well commented.

(Optional) Experiment with them and try to break things. The only way to make sure you understood something is trying to break it or replicate it with different commands.

TL;DR: First read the README on each folder, then the code files. If you’re brave, try to code them yourself.

We will want to do many things with our OS:

  • Boot from scratch, without GRUB – DONE!
  • Enter 32-bit mode – DONE
  • Jump from Assembly to C – DONE!
  • Interrupt handling – DONE!
  • Screen output and keyboard input – DONE!
  • A tiny, basic libc which grows to suit our needs – DONE!
  • Memory management
  • Write a filesystem to store files
  • Create a very simple shell
  • User mode
  • Maybe we will write a simple text editor
  • Multiple processes and scheduling

Probably we will go through them in that order, however it’s soon to tell.

If we feel brave enough:

  • A BASIC interpreter, like in the 70s!
  • A GUI
  • Networking

This is a personal learning project, and even though it hasn’t been updated for a long time, I still have hopes to get into it at some point.

I’m thankful to all those who have pointed out bugs and submitted pull requests. I will need some time to review everything and I cannot guarantee that at this moment.

Please feel free to fork this repo. If many of you are interested in continuing the project, let me know and I’ll link the “main fork” from here.

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start from scratch

Want to thank TFD for its existence? Tell a friend about us, add a link to this page, or visit the webmaster’s page for free fun content.

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Self-confidence is something everyone loves to have. And building one’s confidence is not so difficult. In fact, you can build your confidence from scratch. There are various ways to go about this. Some of the ways that you can use to build your confidence from scratch will be discussed.

AVOID NEGATIVE THOUGHTS

The first criterion for building self-confidence is to avoid all negative thoughts. To build your confidence from scratch, you should do away with all your negative thoughts because negative thoughts are a stumbling block and they prevent people from reaching their full potential. Thoughts like “I cannot do this”, “This is impossible”, “I will likely fail if I try this”, “This is not for people like me”, and other similar thoughts must be avoided. People who usually find excuses to avoid doing things are known to exhibit lack of self-confidence and low self-esteem.

BELIEVE IN YOURSELF

If you must build your confidence, you need to learn to do things. You have to believe in yourself. Undertake tasks and do not be scared of failing. It is better to try and fail than never to try at all. Trying makes you get better at what you do. And the better you get, the more confident you are about doing that thing. To buttress this point, there is a proverb that says “practice makes perfect.” This means that the more you practice something, the better you get at it. And being good at doing something plays a huge role in developing your self-confidence.

There is also a saying that “those who said it cannot be done should not interrupt those that are trying to do it.” This is a very powerful quote that needs to be put into practice. If you want to build your self-confidence then you should join the category of people who get things done by trying and not the category of people who believe that they cannot do it. In order to be able to achieve this, try to create positive thoughts. Thoughts like “I know that I can do this”, “I can succeed if I try to do this”, “People who have been doing this are not better than me”, “if somebody can do this then I should be able to”, and so on.

Going to school or being educated will equip you with resources needed to become successful in your career. However, developing yourself will make you have confidence. If you want to build your self-esteem and increase your knowledge in any field then you have to develop yourself. It is not compulsory that you must sit for every exam but just ensure that you read books on various topics, and read widely. Numerous successful people have confirmed that reading widely improves their vocabulary and language skills, which in turn, boosts their confidence. Most of these successful people do not usually have time to undertake lectures, go to classrooms, complete assignments and carry out other activities required of students taking professional and/or developmental courses. So, they ensure that read different books whenever they are free or when they want to relax.

THINK OF HOW YOU WANT TO BE

Another way that you can build your confidence is to visualize or imagine how you to want to be. Having an idea or a perception of how you want to be will make it possible for you to have a plan that will guide you to successfully achieve your goals. Visualisation has been known to be a very useful technique that helps people struggling with low self-confidence to build their confidence.

LOVE YOUR PHYSICAL APPEARANCE

One factor that can make someone to have a low self-confidence is hating or disliking his physical appearance. The trick to change this perception is to always look in the mirror and appreciate what you see. Do not compare yourself to anybody else. Instead of trying to be somebody else, develop yourself into who other people will want to be like. When you look at yourself in the mirror, say “I know that I am special, and I can become who I want to be”. You can equally make other positive and uplifting statements.

As discussed above, believing in yourself plays a very crucial role in building your confidence.

Do not only have positive thoughts and/or believe in yourself but also take action. Taking action is the most important factor in personal development and building of self-confidence. Successful people did not become successful by just having positive thoughts but by taking actions to bring their thoughts to reality.

People who want to become successful must have self-confidence, they must be tenacious, they must be passionate, they must be aggressive, they must be persistent, and most importantly, they must be hardworking. So, if you wish to be successful then you should adopt all those attributes that are listed.

ASSOCIATE WITH SUPPORTIVE PEOPLE

Associating with the people who love you is another way that you can build your confidence. These people can be family and friends. However, among friends and family, there are people who can dampen your spirit, the killjoys. Try as much as possible to stay away from such people. The point here is that you should get closer to the people who will commend you when you do something good and avoid those that will criticize you when you make a mistake. The more you receive commendations, the more your confidence increases.

Finally, it is always strongly advocated that people build confidence from scratch so that it will be easy for them to succeed in a dynamic world or environment. Consequently, it should be known that the people who have remarkable confidence and self-esteem are those that learned how to build them from scratch.

You’ve probably thought of this pretty important question: How can I leverage resources if I myself do not have a lot of money? There are actually more than a few ways to make money using very little capitol at all.

Tutoring

Anyone remotely confident who doesn’t have much money, and who doesn’t work more than 50 hours a week, should be tutoring. That’s step number 1. Tutoring pays between 40 and 75 bucks an hour in cities like Manhattan. You’re going to be paid $100 an hour to tutor 10-year-old kids. You don’t have to be an expert in chemistry because these are very elementary, basic subjects. If you’re tutoring 20 hours a week at $40 an hour, that’s another $3200 a month. That’s $40,000 a year. Your knowledge is a resource all of the time, but when you’re broke, it can seriously benefit you financially.

Rent Your Resources

  • Put your apartment up for rent on Airnb if you have friends that you can stay with a few days a month. People want to rent them, sometimes for weekends and sometimes for entire weeks. So, go visit with your parents. Sit on anybody’s couch, and make some money from your apartment.
  • Rent out your car to folks while you’re at work all day. It’s just sitting there anyway. Think about the Uber system.
  • Look at all the crap you have all over the house. For instance, that camera that you bought for $200 and now you couldn’t even sell it for $65. Rent it out to your friends when they go on trips. Ask for $20 deposit, and rake in the dough over and over.

How to build confidence from scratch“An Episode of Hoarders?” by BuzzFarmers @ Flickr.com

Sell Your Junk

You should also seriously think about selling what you have that you don’t need. Everyone has junk all over their home, and we see it so much that we just get used to it. Instead of dusting it, sell it. Old valuable jewelry form the sterling silver earrings australia collection? If you aren’t going to repair it, sell it. Whatever you have, it doesn’t matter what, sell it if you’re not using it.

There are ways to leverage your resources, even when you’re broke. You can always become a tutor. Rent out your belongings, your car and your home to help come with extra cash. And, naturally, if you don’t use something, sell it. In fact, sites like cash for cars Las Vegas can help you sell your unused cars if you have any.

Assessment

  • Have you ever thought of tutoring? You probably have skills you haven’t even thought of leveraging to others. If you can write, do math, know,computers or fine arts, you could make good money sharing that information.
  • Make a list of five things you could tutor, and five prospective markets for each skill.
  • Do you own property? List five ways you could rent it or otherwise leverage it for greater value and more money.

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README.md

Neovim from scratch

Important Update When I initially created this repo I didn’t anticipate the amount of breaking changes, if you’d like to use the same basic config as this one as a base I recommend my new repo: nvim-basic-ide

Each video will be associated with a branch so checkout the one you are interested in, you can follow along with this playlist.

Try out this config

Make sure to remove or move your current nvim directory

IMPORTANT Requires [Neovim v0.8.0]](https://github.com/neovim/neovim/releases). Upgrade if you’re on an earlier version.

Run nvim and wait for the plugins to be installed

NOTE (You will notice treesitter pulling in a bunch of parsers the next time you open Neovim)

Open nvim and enter the following:

You’ll probably notice you don’t have support for copy/paste also that python and node haven’t been setup

So let’s fix that

First we’ll fix copy/paste

On mac pbcopy should be builtin

Next we need to install python support (node is optional)

Neovim python support

Neovim node support

NOTE make sure you have node installed, I recommend a node manager like fnm.

Upgrade to latest release

Assuming you built from source, cd into the folder where you cloned neovim and run the following commands.

The computing scientist’s main challenge is not to get confused by the complexities of his own making.

– Edsger W. Dijkstra

About

A Neovim config designed from scratch to be understandable

How to build confidence from scratch

Better self-esteem in one of the top five goals for kids that I hear from parents when they come into my office. Low self-esteem can manifest in different ways. It can look like the child that is constantly seeking praise and reassurance from others, showing off or asking if others like what they’ve done. Or a child that never seems to feel like they are good at anything, putting themselves down or comparing themselves to others. Or a child that has an extreme reaction and meltdown to any criticism or perceived insult, no matter how small. Or the child with a special need or diagnosis that can only focus on what is “wrong” with them. All of these children need extra help in building positive self-esteem.

Self-esteem stars can be a great activity to highlight positive characteristics in a child and build self-esteem. This is especially great for the child that seems to always focus on negative events and their own failings, forgetting about all the positive things that they have done. We begin the activity in session with a few stars and then it becomes a homework activity to be continued at home with the parents. In addition to helping the child notice and remember their positive qualities, the self-esteem stars activity brings parent and child together to talk about their day and helps the parent to focus on something their child is doing well.

Print and cut out several paper stars. Talk with the child about a few positive qualities that they have and specific examples that demonstrated these characteristics. Fill this in on the stars and let the child decorate the stars if they wish. At home, they can choose a place to hang the stars. For homework, they should work with their parents everyday to fill in a new star and add to the collection, surrounding themselves with concrete reminders of their positive traits and abilities. Encourage parent and child to always include a specific example so that the child does not doubt the praise or consider it an empty compliment.

A version of this article for parents was first posted on my private practice blog. Original article can be seen here. It also includes some tips for parents on effective use of praise.

I wish I could cite the original source of this idea. It was something that I heard about doing in a training when I worked in foster care group home/residential treatment.

Carolyn Mehlomakulu, LMFT, ATR is a psychotherapist in Austin, Texas who works with children, adolescents, and families. For more information about individual therapy, adolescent and child counseling, family therapy, teen group therapy, and art therapy services, please visit www.therapywithcarolyn.com .

This blog is not intended to diagnose or treat any mental health conditions. All directives, interventions, and ideas should be used by qualified individuals within the appropriate bounds of their education, training, and scope of practice. Information presented in this blog does not replace professional training in child and family therapy, art therapy, or play therapy .

This blog includes affiliate links. If you’d like to help support the blog without any extra cost to you, please click through on Amazon links and shop as you normally would.

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About Carolyn Mehlomakulu

Carolyn Mehlomakulu, LMFT-S, ATR-BC is an art therapist in Austin, Texas who works with children, teens, and families. Carolyn also provides art therapy supervision and clinical supervision for LMFT-Associates. For more information about individual therapy, teen and child counseling, family therapy, teen group therapy, and art therapy services, please visit: www.therapywithcarolyn.com. In addition to blogging and working with clients, Carolyn enjoys making her own art, reading, running, enjoying nature, and spending time with her son and husband.

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Hi and welcome to the Creativity in Therapy blog! I’m Carolyn Mehlomakulu – an art therapist and psychotherapist. I started this blog so that I could share creative resources with other mental health professionals, both art therapists and therapists that want to bring art and creativity in to their work. In addition to the blog, I see clients in private practice, enjoy making art, reading, and spending time in nature, and have fun with my family. Learn More…

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