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How to buy an emoji domain

Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero. Read more.

How to buy an emoji domain

Emoji are awesome, and even old people (like my 30-year old friends) are starting to realize it now. They add nuance to text messages that you can’t express with boring words. But emoji can do even more than that: now you can register emoji domains. I’ve bought www.🇨🇮.to. Click the link and you get taken to my Twitter page! Let’s look at how.

Find a Top Level Domain That Supports Emoji Domains

You used to be able to register any emoji domain you could think of, but since ICAAN (the group who manages domain names) changed the rules in 2010, there are only a few top level domains that support them. You can’t buy www.😈.com for example; although if you bought one before 2010, like someone did with www.♨.com, you’re still okay.

Most top level domains you’ve heard of, such as .com, .net, .org, and so on are out. But there are two that do support them: .to and .ws. They’re the top level domains for Tonga and Western Samoa, respectively.

As emoji get more popular, however, there’s a good chance more top level domains will allow emoji domains. Keep a look out, and you might be able to snap up an awesome single character emoji domain as they become available.

The Emoji Domain Workaround

Emoji domains work slightly different than regular ones. Most domains only use ASCII characters (the Latin alphabet without accents, numbers, and symbols). In fact, until 2010, they were the only characters domain names supported.

Emoji, however, are Unicode characters. Rather than a limited character set, Unicode includes everything from Cyrillic script to my beloved 🙃.

The problem was that important Unicode characters, like á or ë, couldn’t be used in domain names. This isn’t an issue if you’re American, but it is if you’re French or German. To overcome this, a system called Punycode was developed that allowed domain names to include Unicode characters.

Domain names were prepended with xn-- and then a string of ASCII characters inserted that corresponded to a specific Unicode character. www.Hárry.com is the same as www.xn--hrry-5na.com/. The users’ browser would show the version with the Unicode character, while in the background, go to the Punycode version of the domain.

How to buy an emoji domain

Accents and important Unicode characters aren’t the only ones with corresponding Punycodes, however. All Unicode characters have them. My domain, www.🇨🇮.to, is actually www.xn--g77hma.to; it’s just that your browser shows one thing while looking up another.

This means that you need two things to register an emoji domain: a top level domain that supports emoji, and the Punycode for it.

Work Out the Punycode

Let’s start with finding out the Punycode for the domain you want to register. We’re going to use Punycoder.com.

It’s super simple: just enter the domain you want in the left hand text box and click Covert to Punycode. If you’re not sure how to insert emoji, check out our guide on the subject.

How to buy an emoji domain

You can see in the screenshot above that www.🙃.to converts to www.xn--b48h.to.

You aren’t limited to just single emoji domains. You can mix in regular ASCII characters as well. The .ws top level domain lets you use a few different emoji.

How to buy an emoji domain

www.I❤️💙💖JustinPot.ws is the rather complicated www.xn--ijustinpot-co3g08699bdba.ws in Punycode.

Find Out If It’s Registered

Now that you’ve got the Punycode for the domain you want to register, it’s time to see if anyone else got their first with a WHOIS lookup. This just checks if a domain is registered and, if it is, who owns it.

Head to Domaintools’ WHOIS lookup, enter the Punycode version of your domain, and then hit Search.

How to buy an emoji domain

Good news! This domain is available.

How to buy an emoji domain

If it wasn’t, we’d have seen something like this instead:

How to buy an emoji domain

Register Your Domain

Once you’ve found an unregistered domain, it’s time to make it yours. For a .to domain, head to www.Register.to. For a .ws domain, you can use most good domain registrars. My favorite is Hover, but pick any one you like.

How to buy an emoji domain

Enter the Punycode version of your domain, click Register and you’re on your way.

A Caveat: Emoji Domains Aren’t Always Supported

One warning. Don’t use an emoji domain for something super critical. While they work in all browsers, other apps may not like them. If you copy an emoji domain into another app for example, it often won’t see it as a real URL.

The other issue is that a lot of emoji are similar. 😁.ws and 😄.ws are two different URLs, but god only knows how you remember which one you own.

I love my emoji domain. I’ve no idea what I’m going to do with the Ivory Coast flag (or the flag of an Irish ship in distress!) but I like owning it.

Emoji have taken the world by storm in recent years, so it’s no surprise to see Emoji make an appearance in one of the cornerstones of the Internet: domain names.

In this blog post, we’ll cover some Emoji domain history, information on buying Emoji domains, and explain why you might want to own one.

Some Emoji domain history ⏳

Emoji domains aren’t exactly a new phenomena.

💩.la, a domain also affectionately known as Poopla, was registered back in 2011 by Panic, maker of popular Mac/iPad/iPhone apps.

Poopla is still accessible today and is widely regarded as the world’s first Emoji domain.

The Emoji domain craze received renewed interest when Coca Cola, maker of popular sugary beverages, used a series of Emoji domains for an ad campaign.

Billboards towering over the highways of Puerto Rico featured nothing but URLs containing single Emoji-based domains like www.😛.ws (face with stuck-out tongue) and www.😀.ws (grinning face).

But Emoji domains are not just reserved for popular software makers and big soda conglomerates. You can have them too.

Emoji Domain Buyer’s Toolbox 🛠

To buy an Emoji domain, you’ll need the following:

  • An Emoji keyboard. On Mac OS X devices, use ctrl+cmd+space to pull it up.
  • A domain registrar that supports direct Emoji input. IWantMyName.com works best for this.
  • A Punycode converter. We’ll be using Punycoder.com.

Punycode is the underlying encoding of Emoji, and you’ll want to know the Punycode analog of your Emoji domain.

Not every domain extension supports Emoji 😩

Most domain extensions do not support Emoji domains. In fact, you’re pretty much just limited to .ws, the extension of Western Samoa commonly referred to as an abbreviation for “website.”

While the aforementioned 💩.la domain is still a thing, the Laos domain administrators no longer allow new registrations of Emoji domains. Poopla has been grandfathered in.

The island of Tokelau can also support them with their .tk extension. You can even register one for “free” at dot.tk.

Checking availability of Emoji domains ?

I like IWantMyName for checking Emoji domain availability, as it is the only registrar I could find which supports direct Emoji input.

While other registrars will allow you to register them, you’ll have to convert them to Punycode first with a tool like Punycoder.

For example, the heart eyes face (😍) will be converted to xn--r28h. Then just add .ws to the end. Piece of 🎂.

It’s worth shopping around. At the time of this writing, Go Daddy has a $4.99 for the first year special on .ws. 🤑

Many of the most popular Emoji are already taken in .ws. However, Emoji domains become much more available in groups of two Emoji or more.

Why on 🌍 would I want an emoji domain? 🤔

At WordCamp Lancaster, it caused quite a stir when Anthony D. Paul concluded his talk about user testing with a reference to his personal Emoji domain: ⚡️❄️.ws (verbalized as “thunder snow dot ws”).

After that, I grabbed one of my own to honor one of my favorite foods.

And many others followed suit.

Will it help my SEO? 😎

No. I can’t imagine a worse possible type of domain if you’re concerned at all about SEO-friendliness.

Despite Emoji’s surging popularity, support can be slim outside of the default support you’ll find in Apple and Android devices.

It’s best that these domains are immediately redirected. You don’t want to attempt to host a website on an Emoji domain. At least not until Emoji support becomes a little less precarious.

When linking, use Emoji in the anchor text, but the Punycode for the href itself.

That’s all folks 🐰

While I’m cognizant of the fact that Emoji domains will be increasingly less cool as more people use them, brandishing an Emoji domain in an appropriate setting will have a parlor-trick-esque allure for years to come.

Emoji are meant to be fun and light-hearted, so don’t overthink it. Which Emoji domains did you get?

Arghya Saha

How to buy an emoji domain

Couple of years back I saw a weird domain printed on a marketing leaflet, it had emoji in the domain. The first impression I had–

Such a blunder, how could the team not check the domain name before printing the leaflets and also now they are distributing it .

After being skeptical, I took a step back and thought, “this is a company who are always cautious about their execution.” So I went to my mobile browser and typed the domain, to my utter surprise, the website actually worked 🤯 . All of a sudden I became curious of this, and started to dig deeper into the tech behind it.

Emoji domains are something which has being around for quite sometime, in fact the first emoji domain was created on 2001. Let’s quickly see how one can own a emoji domain.

  • Go to https://i❤.ws/ search the domain which you want to purchase.

How to buy an emoji domain

  • You would see the punycode which would be the alphanumeric domain which you can purchase. For example – a❤tech.tk would be converted to the following string https://xn--atech-102c.tk

How to buy an emoji domain

  • You can purchase any emoji domain for free from Freenom service.

You can read more about how to purchase a domain for free for the lifetime. Below in my another blog.

How to buy an emoji domain

How to buy an emoji domain

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How to buy an emoji domain

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Yes, emoji 🔥 domain names are possible and they are a thing.

Emoji domain names are a great opportunity for marketing 💰 in my opinion and shouldn’t be ignored.

For instance, ✌️.com is a great emoji domain name example that is accessible and redirects to AngelList.com.

How to buy an emoji domainPicture by iabzd, from Unsplash

Now, let me tell you everything you want to know about emoji domain names without the fluff:

  • Yes, you can have one ✌️ or more ✌️✌️✌️ emoji’s in a domain name, including normal text.
  • Not all domain TLDs accept emojis. For example, you can’t register emojis with .com domains.
  • The most popular TLDs that accepts emoji domain names are .ws, .to & .fm.
  • Emojis are automatically translated into Punycode by the browser, so when you access ✌️.com, your browser will automatically translate that to xn--7bi.com
  • Yes, all modern browsers and devices already support emoji domain names.

Table of Contents

How to register an Emoji Domain name

Let’s get into the actual registering and let me show you the exact steps that you need to take in order to register an Emoji domain name ✌️.

TLDs that accept emojis in domain names

As I’ve mentioned above, not all TLDs accept emojis in their domain names. Therefore, you must choose from a pretty short list of TLDs (for now).

Here are the most popular Top Level Domains:

  • .ws – You can register .ws domains via Bluehost
  • .to – You can register .to domains directly from their official register.to website
  • .fm – You can register .fm domains from their official get.fm website

There are also other Top Level Domains that are supposedly accepting Emoji Domains, such as:

  • .tk
  • .ga
  • .cf
  • .ml
  • .gq

These are supposedly free ones that you can get. Unfortunately, from my own research I’ve found that whatever emoji domain you will search with these TLDs, you won’t find any available (probably bugged). Therefore, I wouldn’t recommend going with these ones.

Pick your emoji domain name

There are two things you must do repeatedly until you find an emoji domain that is right for you:

  • Pick an emoji that you like.
  • Pick a TLD for your new domain.
  • Check the availability of the emoji domain.

Check the domain availability 👀

The availability checking is not that simple as your typical ASCII normal text domains for the majority of domain name registrars in case of emoji domains.

Let’s assume that you want to register ✌️🔥💰⚡️.ws.

Here’s how you can properly check the availability of an emoji domain:

1 – Convert your emoji domain to Punycode.

Go to punycoder.com and paste in your emoji domain, just like this:

How to buy an emoji domain

Now you can see that weird looking text that you just got, in this case is the following: xn--57h5np933jmna.ws.

What is up with this weird-looking “Punycode”? Emojis are automatically translated by the browser in this format because they are not your typical ASCII standard characters.

2 – Go to any domain registrar that supports the registration of .ws domains, such as Bluehost.

Now you can paste in the Punycode domain name that you want to register under your name.

3 – Register the domain and configure it with a web host, just as you would do with any other domain. After the completion, you will be able to access your domain just by writing those emojis in the browser.

That’s it! You now have your own emoji accessible domain name 🔥.

Why would you want an emoji domain name?

Emoji domain names can help you with your marketing if done right and staying right on trend.

Some pretty big websites already have got themselves such domain names:

  • Mailchimp – 💌.ws
  • AngelList – ✌️.com
  • SonyPictures – 😊🎬.ws
  • BikeMagazine – 🚵.ws
  • BudWeiser – ❤️🍺.ws

Coca-cola ran a big and successful campaign with the 😀.ws emoji domain back in 2015.

But still, why would you want to have emojis in your domain?

  • They are easily remembered if done right (single or 2-3 emojis on a domain).
  • They grow your brand power are an innovative and inexpensive marketing tool.
  • Emoji domains are cool, and yes, I did purchase one for myself and my brand 👀.
  • You can still get single emoji domains, which are the best, in my opinion.

Some single emoji domains for the .ws TLD are selling for hundreds, if not thousands of dollars in some cases, depending on the popularity of the emoji.

Yes, you should get one.

This is my conclusion and suggestion for you. If you have a brand that you want to grow, get a nice, representative emoji domain.

No, I would not suggest you to use an emoji domain as your main website. Simply purchase an emoji domain and redirect to your main domain 🤗.

Let me know in the comments if you got yourself an emoji domain, really curious 👋.

Example Emoji Domains

  • 😀.fm
  • 👁👄👁.fm
  • 📙.ws👓.ws
  • ❤️🍺.ws
  • i❤️tacos.ws
  • 🍆.ws
  • 🍕💩.ws
  • brad❤️jennifer.ws
  • 🐮.ws
  • i❤️pottery.ws
  • 🤓 browse by category
  • 😀 browse .ws domains
  • 📻 browse .fm domains
  • 🖼️ emoji site gallery
  • 😜 weird random domains
  • 💰 emoji domain marketplace
  • 🆒 available emoji domains

As Seen In.

🗜️📰 Vice News!
🛸🛵 Gizmodo
🌵📈 PHX Business Journal
💰📰 Fortune
🖥📡 CNET
💸🕴 FastCompany
📅✉ DailyMail.co.uk
🏪⚔ LifeHacker
🔮💻 Quartz
🚀🔥 The Definitive Guide to Emoji Domains
🔎🤑 Digital Marketer’s Guide to Emoji Domains: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3

Emoji Domains are 100% compatible with all browsers!

Most people have no idea they can just type emoji in their address bar and go to a domain.

. and yet, here you are.

Feels pretty good, doesn’t it?

You know. to be all cool and cutting edge and stuff.

How does it work?

Behind the scenes, all domains are ASCII text, even if you see the domain name displayed as an emoji.

The actual mechanics aren’t that important, but the key thing to know is that the browser uses a strategy called “punycoding” to convert “i❤️” to “xn--i-7iq” behind the scenes.

Most browsers keep this process hidden. but even when it’s not, your Emoji Domain will work.

Can I have both an Emoji Domain and a “regular” Domain?

Yeah! Check out 😎🌐.ws, which displays as either 😎🌐.ws or cooldomain.ws, depending on browser support. With our drop in Emoji Domain Progressive Enhancement JavaScript, it only takes about 30 seconds to set up.

When I purchase a domain, why does it go to GoDaddy?

With i❤️, you’re not buying domains from some sketchy dude on a street corner.

Find a domain you love. Buy it through GoDaddy, with the confidence of high quality support and reliability from a multibillion dollar company with operations all over the world.

Domain Research Group, we made this site. We’re connecting the dots, showing you new possibilities.

Compatibility with GoDaddy services?

Yup! As a demo, Domain Research Group built i❤️tacos.ws, an example site we put together on GoCentral, GoDaddy’s excellent new website builder.

Forwarding, SSL, DNS. all the normal GoDaddy services, that all works. This site comes to you from a VM somewhere deep within a GoDaddy datacenter.

Email is a little sketchy — not because the services don’t work, but because some mail transports reject unicode domains.

Can I use my domain as a URL shortener?

Emoji + ASCII?

Emoji Search Results?

Is there an Emoji Domain API?

What about Emoji Domain Name Auctions?

The Emoji Domain Name Marketplace Report presents GoDaddy auctions listings in a clear and concise manner. All Emoji Domains, all the time.

Supported .TLDs

Not All .TLDs

Only a handful of Top Level Domains currently allow the registration of emoji domains. And within that bunch, we’ve partnered with the best: .ws, .fm and .to.

Started in 1995, .ws and .fm lead the pack in both reliability and innovation.

Also launched commercially in the late 90s, .to is known throughout the world for URL shorteners / travel sites.

i❤️.com: Don’t Hold Your Breath

Dotcom, dotnet, dotorg. as well as all those .ninja and .guru domain extensions — they’re gTLDs, bound by ICANN rules. That is to say, they won’t be allowed to register Emoji Domains until some international body yields to the march of progress.

While this might change in the future, for now, ICANN, the governing body of internet domain names, has banned the practice.

Apparently, while they allow all kinds of weird unicode characters in domain names, they don’t think emoji are a valid form of communication.

How Can .ws, .to and .fm Offer Emoji Domains?

It’s always been technically feasible. it’s just that no one ever really thought to do it.

If you’re interested, you can read a brief history of Emoji Domains, but the short story is that a ccTLD (country top level domain) like .ws, as the official designated registry partner of the government of Western Samoa, is, like, a sovereign entity.

As ccTLDs, they’re free to experiment, try new things, be pioneers. Not sure it’s a coincidence that they all originate in island nations.

Maybe you’re a ccTLD too? Hit us up! It might be easier than you think to get on board.

A Brief History of Emoji Domains

  • 2001: ☮️.com
    The stuff of controversy! The first Emoji Domain was registered on April 19, 2001. The Definitive Guide to Emoji Domains notes that three domains were registered that day: ☮️.com, ♨️.com, ♨️.net

That’s the hot springs symbol. It’s a Japanese thing.

Also that year: ☃️.com, registered by some guy named Gregg. It is not for sale. (I asked.) Maybe he saw something he liked in Unicode 1.1?

Let me be the first to say that I’m not certain where emoji domains are headed.

It’s highly unlikely that they’ll become the .com darling or widely accepted and used as a primary web presence option for businesses and personal brands.

You have to admit that emojis spice domains up a bit although not a complete replacement. In fact, I believe emojis lend themselves well to being using in print ads as short links.

That’s one of the very reasons keyword domains exist today is because we humans can’t seem to remember IP addresses.

With a decent chunk of .com domains registered, emojis just might supplement the story plot a bit more. How you ask?

So much can be said with an emoji and much context can be lost too when not used or interpreted appropriately.

Nevertheless, many people want to register .com emoji domains but don’t realize it’s not an option due to Internationalized Domain Names in Applications 2008 (IDNA2008).

If not familiar with IDNA 2008, it states the following:

In the original version of the Internationalized Domain Names in Applications (IDNA) protocol, any Unicode code points taken from user input were mapped into a set of Unicode code points that “made sense”, and then encoded and passed to the domain name system (DNS). The IDNA2008 protocol (described in RFCs 5890, 5891, 5892, and 5893) presumes that the input to the protocol comes from a set of “permitted” code points, which it then encodes and passes to the DNS, but does not specify what to do with the result of user input. This document describes the actions that can be taken by an implementation between receiving user input and passing permitted code points to the new IDNA protocol.

Said in plain English, we’re trying to protect users of .com domains from being tricked into security breaches due to lack of uniformity and secure structure.

Although a few emoji domains were registered, IDNA2008 does not allow for .com and .net emoji domain registration.

Not being able to register .com emojis have stumped a good number of people and is likely acting as a barrier to limit emoji exposure long term.

Nevertheless, the good news is that there are extensions that allow emoji domain registration. You likely know that you can register .ws domains at GoDaddy and Website.ws.

But what you may not have known is that you can register emoji domains in the following seven (13) ccTLD extensions:

  • .ws (primary)
  • .to (Register.to)
  • .fm
  • .cf
  • .ga
  • .gg
  • .gq
  • .je
  • .kz
  • .ml
  • .ai
  • .st
  • .tk
  • .wein

Look no further than Freenom.com to purchase your next non .ws emoji domain(s). Freenom offers both paid and non-paid domain registrations.

The one thing to note about the non-paid domain registrations is that Freenom does not allow speculative purchases.

So, if you think you’re going to mass register emoji domains using Freenom, then you better think again.

Even if you pay, Freenom wants to ensure that you are using the domain as an active fully developed website. That means no landing page or coming soon business, or you’ll lose the domain altogether.

You may think this is a bit unfair or fraudulent on Freenom’s part, but Freenom explicitly states this with their terms and conditions service agreement and policy. Read more here…

I personally think it’s a pretty fair request of Freenom. After all, no one is holding a gun to anyone’s head making them register any domain exclusively with Freenom. It’s your call.

Where can you buy, sell, or lease/rent emoji domains?

Now that you know where and what extensions are available when purchasing and registering emoji domains, then use one of the following links to spark your emoji domain imagination:

If you find any additional resources, please feel free to share in the comments below. I’ll review and add them should I deem the emoji resource applicable.

That’s all for now! Happy emoji domain mining!

Emoji URLs seem to fit perfectly into this day and age: they are funky, striking, and stay in your mind. The younger generation has always managed to incorporate smileys into their everyday life, since they are all over message services and social networks. After the renowned Oxford dictionary chose the laughing with tears emoji to be the word of the year, it seems the funny images are more popular than ever.

So, are emojis a logical development in written communication? They are already vital for communication among youngsters. In the meantime, they’re even popping up in browser address-bars: as emoji URLs. How do you register an emoji domain? What benefits does it have? And where does this trend come from?

  1. From emoticons to emoji domains – the story of the digital smiley
  2. Emojis – the graphical development of emoticons
  3. Why were emojis developed in the first place?
  4. How are smiley URLs technically possible?
  5. Setting up an emoji URL– why not use .com?
  6. Setting up an emoji URL: how are smileys added?
  7. The benefits of smiley URLs
  8. Why emoji domain names can still be problematic

From emoticons to emoji domains – the story of the digital smiley

Emojis originate from the dark times before digital communication. In 1982, the characters ‘:-)’ were entered and that’s where everything began. The computer science professor Scott Fahlman used a bulletin board on the intranet of the University of Pittsburgh where he worked. This bulletin board could be described as the forerunner of today’s discussion forum. He created the smiley out of a series of characters and made the first ever emoticon – the basis for the emojis used today from pixels or vectors. These are visually more appealing than the plain emoticons from back then.

In the internet’s earlier years, emoticons were the only way to get a feeling across in comments, posts, or e-mails. The emoticon language quickly developed a life of its own and spread globally thanks to the emerging mobile SMS communication. Smileys were used even more frequently and became more complex in order to express more complicated emotions.

From a linguistic point of view, the emoticons’ non-verbal ‘language’ is particularly interesting, since it’s been possible to use faces, animals, plants, or entire image compositions to convey emotions for a long time. Since the 1990s, abstract ASCII characters have been used to create works of art, which have been spread over message boards and discussion forums. There are practically no limits when it comes to the Japanese emoticons of ASCII art e.g. Kaomoji. A prominent example of this type of art is the so-called table flip ノಠل͟ಠ༽ノ-︵-┻━┻, which symbolizes the angry turning over of a table.

Emojis – the graphical development of emoticons

The trend towards graphically appealing emoticons started in the late 1990s in Japan. The technical advancement of mobile phones and their displays made it possible to show the right smileys instead of the binary character strings that were originally used to express feelings or moods. Images started to be used to respond to short messages, because the Japanese mobile network was becoming overloaded with over 80 million manic writers. The images were therefore developed to relieve the network.

The word ’emoji’ is a neologism consisting of the Japanese words ‘picture’ (e) and ‘characters’ (moji). The inventor of the modern emoji was Shigetaka Kurita, who worked on the ambitious i-mode project in the late 1990s. This was the foundation of the first large mobile internet platform for daily newsfeeds, weather reports, entertainment, event reservations, and more. Due to the modest device hardware and the limited data transfer possibilities, some limitations had to be allowed. One example is that only adjectives could be used for the weather forecast. To get around this, images such as clouds and suns could be used, and this would reduce the transmission volume of the i-mode provider.

Why were emojis developed in the first place?

One of the reasons for creating and further developing the emojis comes down to the peculiarities of the Japanese language. Without being able to have a face-to-face conversation, some Japanese phrases can end up being misinterpreted. Without being able to see gestures and facial expressions, a casual sentence can be interpreted positively, negatively, or disinterestedly. Kurita decided to attempt the task of drawing human facial expressions in a small box consisting of 12 x 12 pixels and use 176 characters to turn human emotion into mobile electronic communication.

Since the technical capabilities weren’t very advanced, the results weren’t exactly visually appealing. Many emojis could only be identified if you used your imagination and even then, the meaning wasn’t 100% obvious. Scott Fahlman, the inventor of the emoticons, came to the conclusion that the creations were ‘rather ugly’. The success of i-mode, however, prompted other Japanese mobile providers to copy this emoji concept. This resulted in many different emoji systems that weren’t compatible with each other. It was only in 2012 that the different emoji systems in Japan were standardized to reduce errors when sending and receiving emojis using different providers.

Emojis have become more and more popular since they were implemented internationally on iPhone in iOS versions 5 in 2011. Afterwards, they were adapted to Android devices and other mobile operating systems. Android, however, limited itself to one emoji system. It’s difficult to imagine a time when these colorful little graphics weren’t all over Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and other social media platforms.

How are smiley URLs technically possible?

ICANN deemed it a technical possibility to create domain names with non-ASCII characters as early on as 2003 with its ‘Internationalizing Domain Names in Applications‘ system or ‘IDNA’ for short. This was long before the first emoji URL was registered in 2011.

IDNs (‘Internationalized Domain Names’) can be created using Unicode, the widespread, international coding standard with over 120,000 characters from dozens of scripts and symbol sets. Virtually all web browsers already support Unicode. IDNs enable most non-ASCII characters in the Unicode repertoire to be displayed as ASCII-compatible character strings. Since the latest Unicode standard also contains many emojis, the door for emoji domains is theoretically open.

DNS uses a limited amount of the already relatively limited ASCII character set. Punycode is used to translate a domain name that contains complex Unicode characters. A Punycode string consists exclusively of the letters A-Z, the digits 0-9 and the dash symbol. Because this translation takes place in the web browser and not in the DNS, the IDNs work without further changes. Practically every conceivable character can be converted into a URL after being converted into Punycode. Registering emoji URLs is now possible.

Like a carousel, language seems to be going full circle. Hieroglyphs etched into the walls of pyramids were the formal writing system used in Ancient Egypt. Language continued to evolve. To quote The Bee Gees: there was a time when words were all we had. But times change.

The emoji is here, and it’s here to stay. The advent of Beaming Face Smileys heralded a brave new world of communication. One which harkens back to the visuality of hieroglyphs many years earlier. From cute footnotes, to text messages, animojis, to Google search, a new alphabet is here – one which transcends existing language.

If Shakespeare was alive today, would he have parachuted the pixelated pioneers into his texts or work? It’s impossible to say. One thing’s for sure though, emojis are more than a trend. And the technological mediums through which they are delivered continue to evolve.

GoDaddy should know. After all, back in 2016 we introduced i❤.ws — the world’s first Emoji Domain Registration search engine, so people could easily search for, and purchase, emoji-based domain names.

With two years of insights in the back pocket, a number of interesting trends have bubbled to the surface. These include an increase in the number of emoji/ascii mixed domains, visual pun emoji domains, and major brands such as Budweiser using emoji domains to forward to their main webpages.

With World Emoji Day upon us, we’ve gone all Sherlock Holmes and conducted some investigative research into emoji domains. From the top ten most popular emojis used in domains, to the highest selling emoji domain, let’s check out the findings.

Most popular domain emojis of all-time

According to Apple, the Face with Tears of Joy emoji is the most popular. That’s in everyday usage, though. What about the most popular emojis used in domains?

Check out our findings:

How to buy an emoji domain

GoDaddy’s Emoji Domain findings and facts

Did you know? The highest known sale price for an emoji domain was for http://xn--l3h.com/, aka ☁.com, and it sold for $13,600!

Here’s a few other eye-opening tidbits from our fact finding mission.

How to buy an emoji domain

Mastering the emoji domain

Would your business benefit from an emoji domain? If so, what emoji would you choose as an extension of your brand? Emojis are familiar to buyers, they are a part of their everyday visual lexicon. So it makes sense for brands to jump into that cosey space.

Search for your perfect emoji domain here. And, whilst your at it, find answers to all your emoji domain questions such as:

Laughing out loud’ became ‘lol’, ‘lol’ became the Face with Tears of Joy. The language contraction continues and emojis are the forefront of this. In fact, emojis are so embedded in the culture of our social fabric, we’ve even had to grin and bear through The Emoji Movie.

Like a knife and fork, emojis and communication go hand in hand. Enjoyed this post? Then give it a share on social with a Big Thumbs Up – go on, you know you want to.

Thanks for stopping by i😀.ws! Hopefully, we can answer your questions here, but there’s more information about emoji domains at i❤️.ws.

What is this?

i😀.ws is a site which sells emoji domains specifically on the .ws TLD (Top Level Domain. like .com or .dog). Here, you can look for available .ws emoji domains by character or just or just search for .ws emoji domains.

What is an emoji domain?

An emoji domain is a domain name with emoji in it. like this site: i😀.ws!

How does it work?

Behind the scenes, all domains are ASCII text, even if you see the domain name displayed as an emoji.

The actual mechanics aren’t that important, but the key thing to know is that the browser uses a strategy called “punycoding” to convert “i❤️” to “xn--i-7iq” behind the scenes.

Most browsers keep this process hidden. but even when it’s not, your Emoji Domain will work.

Can I get a dotcom emoji domain?

No! Believe me. we’d love to sell you one, but right now emoji domains banned by ICANN, the UN-like governing body which oversees this area of the internet.

Now, that doesn’t mean you can’t buy an emoji domain — obviously — but they’re mostly supported by smaller TLDs like this one, .ws.

Don’t worry, it’s cool. We use GoDaddy for our backend services, ensuring smooth and easy domain management from a reputable vendor with excellent 24 hour customer service.

If dotcom emoji domains become a thing, we’ll let you know! Follow us on Twitter: @emoji_domains

Where can I see other examples of emoji domains

The emoji domain site gallery at i❤️.ws has many examples of emoji domains currently in use today, by brands both big and small.

Where do I search for other emoji domain TLDs?

i❤️.ws has a complete directory of all available emoji domains, plus information on how to use them, an emoji domain site gallery, and an emoji domain marketplace.

© 2018, Domain Research Group
Straight outta Scottsdale, AZ

Quick Summary of Contents

If you were one of few emoji domain investors to stake claim to a newly release emoji as an emoji domain name, then consider yourself fortunate. 🤩

If you didn’t move quick enough, or didn’t know how to convert Unicode to punycode, then you’ll want to pay close attention and keep reading. 🧐

You’re likely wondering how did folks register emoji domains using Unicode version 11 Emoji when they’ve not yet been released to devices, right? 🤔

I’ll answer this question, sharing with you two ways to convert Unicode to punycode. This should allow you to hopefully get and keep a step ahead in the emoji domain game as new Unicode Emoji versions are released.

Convert Emoji Unicode to Punycode using Emojipedia.org

The easiest way to convert Unicode to punycode is using the Emojipedia.org website. If you’re not familiar with Emojipedia.org, it’s an emoji search engine that allows fast browsing of every emoji by name, category, or platform.

How to buy an emoji domain

Scroll to the bottom of their website, and there should be a few columns displayed.

Find the “Emoji Versions” and “Unicode Versions” columns. These columns give a list of each emoji associated with each version.

How to buy an emoji domain

However, to convert Unicode to punycode of newly released Unicode emoji, we’ll focus on using the “Unicode Versions” column.

At the time of this writing, Unicode 11.0 is the latest version. Go ahead and select the “Unicode 11.0” or the most current Unicode version listed.

Clicking the most current Unicode version link takes you to a page that lists the next version of the Unicode Standard and its scheduled release date.

If visiting this page prior to the release date, then you’ll likely only see linked emoji name with no emoji displayed as shown below.

How to buy an emoji domain

Find the desired emoji name you would like to convert from Unicode to punycode, and click its link. You’ll then be taken to a page for the selected emoji. I’ve chosen the Smiling Face With 3 Hearts emoji for this tutorial.

How to buy an emoji domain

There are two things to note on this page: Codepoints and “Copy and paste this emoji”. The Codepoints (i.e U+1F970) could be taken and converted to punycode (more on that in the next section).

The easiest way to convert Unicode to punycode is simply clicking the “Copy” button, and pasting it into the text input box of Punycoder.com. Remember, the emoji will not show if you’re performing this task prior to the schedule release date.

How to buy an emoji domain

Nevertheless, click the “Convert to Punycode >>” button to convert the emoji into punycode as shown below.

Note that I appended “.ws” domain extension to the emoji, but feel free to append an emoji-friendly domain extension of your choice.

How to buy an emoji domain

Now, you’re able to view and copy the punycode result that starts with “xn--“, and then visit any website that allows for emoji domain registrations to hopefully be the first to register desired emoji domains before any one else.

Convert Emoji Unicode to Punycode using Unicode Code Point

Using Emojipedia.org is about the easiest way to convert emoji Unicode to punycode. However, allow me to share with you another way should Emojipedia.org go down or not updated in a timely manner.

What if you only have Unicode code points for given emoji you would like to register? 🤔

Don’t fret, whether you were provided Unicode code point(s) or you retrieved code points from Unicode website (version 11), you can easily convert emoji Unicode to punycode using xn--domain.net.

How to buy an emoji domain

This simple tool easily converts emoji Unicode to punycode by simply entering the Unicode code point of the desired emoji domain.

If you remembered in the previous section, we made mention of Emojipedia’s Codepoints section. You can use this section or visit Unicode’s Emoji Recently Added to retrieve code points.

In this example, we’ll continue to use “smiling face with 3 hearts” and its code: 1F970. Take the code point and paste it into the “code points” form field in the “Unicode analysis” section (see below).

Once entered, the punycode and Unicode form fields are populated with their respective emoji values. In this case, “te9h” is returned as the punycode for “smiling face with 3 hearts”.

However, to register the punycode as an emoji domain, you’ll need to prepend “xn--“ to the returned punycode value and append an emoji-friendly domain extension.

For example, if I desired a .WS emoji domain using the “smiling face with 3 hearts” emoji, then the emoji domain’s punycode to use when registering at GoDaddy or Website.ws is “xn--te9h.ws”. You could also use .TO or other emoji-friendly domain extensions.

Future Unicode Emoji Releases

Now that you have two methods to convert emoji Unicode to Punycode, you should be well ahead of the emoji domain registration curve.

Best wishes with staking stake your claim to Unicode’s next batch of emoji when their respective code points become available.

Of course, you’ll only be able to register emoji domains using ccTLDs (for now), and only when and where ccTLD have not blocked or reserved registration of future emoji domains.

Last but not least, for those of you NOT wanting to read, I encourage you to watch my quick tutorial about how to convert emoji Unicode to Punycode. 🎥

That’s all for now!

Video Tutorial: Watch and learn how to convert Emoji Unicode and Punycode

One of the more surprising trends to me of late has been Emoji domain names. Over the last couple of years, these domain names have become somewhat popular amongst domain investors. Emoji domain names are not available to buy in many extensions (such as .com), but it seems like some registries have benefitted by making them available to register.

According to a press release this morning, the .FM registry is allowing people to buy Emoji domain names in the .FM extension. .FM is the ccTLD extension for for the Federated States of Micronesia, but I do not believe there are any geographic restrictions for people who want to register .FM domain names. The registry set up a special landing page for people to search for available .FM domain names, which can be found here: https://Get.fm/Emoji

Here’s what the CEO of the company that operates the .FM registry remarked in the press release:

“As part of our 20th Anniversary, we are thrilled ‘Smiley Face’ to officially launch emoji domains under the .FM Top-Level Domain,” remarked George T. Bundy, Chairman & CEO of BRS Media, Inc. “Emoji Branding is the next frontier in Creative Digital Marketing and we look forward to the originality and inspiring usage of emoji domains by dotFM clients. Today emojis are incorporated in all aspects of consumers’ online conversations; mobile devices, social media, texting, messaging, and now web domains! dotFM is excited to be one of only a few prime TLDs to support emoji-based domain names.”

It looks like the registry reserved some of its “premium” Emoji domain names and have them priced accordingly. For instance, 💩.fm (“pile of poo”) is $4,995, 🔥.fm (“fire”) is $3,995, and 🕷.fm (“spider”) is $2,495 for the first year of registration.

.FM domain names are quite expensive compared to other extensions that have made Emoji domain names available (such as .WS). The price of registering an Emoji .FM domain name at GoDaddy, for example, is $118.99. This appears to be a discounted price available via the Get.FM website since the standard pricing is $169.99.

Personally, I am not really big on Emojis or Emoji domain names, but it seems like a smart move for the registry operator to open this potential revenue stream.

DomainSherpa May 20, 2019 7

Are you curious about how emoji domain names work? Are you looking for your niche? Want to be inspired to think differently by a unique entrepreneur’s story? Learn how emoji domain pioneer Matan Israeli views today’s emoji domain market, his ROI, tech updates affecting emoji domain usage, and much more!

  • Matan shares emoji domains ROI, sales strategy & investor vs. end-user percentages.
  • We do some screen shares to see and understand emoji domains in actual usage.

If you’re searching to find your niche, Matan’s thought process and insights will inspire you to think differently! And if you are curious about emoji domain usage, languages in technology, or investing in emoji domains, you will benefit from today’s show!

Your DomainSherpa Review

Your DomainSherpa Interview, Audio Only

Note: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser. Or, listen on iTunes or in your favorite podcast app (here are the feeds).

This Show’s Sherpas

How to buy an emoji domain

Matan Israeli is the owner of at Emojiurl, and owner of Matan Security. Prior to this role, he was a video editor at Moka productions and served in the IDF of Israel.

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7 Responses to “Emoji Domains – ROI, Tech Updates & More – with Matan Israeli”

Fresh. Exciting. Glad to see a unique vector in domains. Needs more software vendors support though, especially online platforms. Definitely has a potential and I’m sure early owners will profit from emoji domains. But adoption will take time, as not only Instagram and other platforms need to add support but also all the platforms that are used to build websites, including one used here in this comments section in the Website field. It’s a too long term investment approach I think.
Thank you for sharing this Tess and Matan!

The main problem, to me, with emoji domains, is that they cannot be used as handles or registration addresses for Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter or Facebook. If they could the values of these would skyrocket. I have some emoji domains and I dropped a bunch of them recently because there is so little practical utility for them right now. You can actually use them as domain addresses. Jon Roig does this for his website. But few people know this so they rarely use them for search. IMO the social networks are where the most of the money is.

Second, new emoji.coms can’t be registered. Except for those of us who bought them from the show in April 2017, most people don’t know that .ws exists. There are some others that emojis were sold with, none terribly recognizable to the general (non domain buying) public, which further muddies the water.

I completely agree with Matan’s international language concept. But there have to be more ways to use them. Just using them as an editorial gimick in a promo photo won’t cut it for long term value.

If you have any info that refutes anything I’ve said here, please educate me. Thanks for the show Tess and Matan!

Matan is a great guy. I was able to buy an emoji name from him a couple of years ago and he was very generous with his knowledge and he even listed it for sale on his site. I sold it recently for a pretty good return, although through a different outlet

Thanks Matan. You’re awesome.

Great episode Matan and Tess.
And I thought I am the only Israeli interested in Domain names

GREAT segment on Emoji Domains! Agreeing with Matan, Emoji domains will become more popular and mainstream once a large company implements Emoji domains into their marketing/advertising campaigns. The visual branding aspect in addition to the universal language-global communication of Emoji Domains makes them a true unicorn in domain name marketing/advertising.

Great episode! Thanks for sharing Matan. Glad things are going well for you. I’m excited for the future of emoji domains and looking forward to how my few (?.ws ⌚.ws) will be used!

Matan. Thank you for continuing to share about emoji domain names. You’ve been generous with your knowledge, and i love your enthusiasm.

plus you’ve got some great emoji domains

glad that emoji domains brought us together.

Emojipedia is a resource for learning more about emoji which uses images from a variety of platforms in an educational manner to document this fascinating and ever-growing collection of characters.

Emoji licensing is a question which we are often asked. “Can I use emoji images for free?” or “How do I license Apple emojis?” (or other vendors)

Emoji characters displayed on Emojipedia belong to their respective font creators. What you can and cannot do with emoji images varies depending on which images you are looking to use.

Multiple options exist for licensing emoji images. For display on the web, “fair use” may apply when referencing emoji related topics.

Emojipedia Sample Images

Emojipedia permits using our original sample images under the usual fair use provisions, to use when discussing new emoji releases. In fact, we welcome this! Please feel free to use our images to illustrate a story or article; with a link provided back here for attribution.

Note: this is not the same as using in a commercial product, for which you will need to use a licensed emoji set (see below).

Vendor Emoji Designs

Many emoji projects exist with various licensing options clearly listed online. Some, but not all, are free or open source. Licensing information about the following emoji sets are linked below:

Each of the above projects have different conditions for how they can be used (online only, print, commercial, etc); and whether there are specific terms for attribution or distribution.

Emojipedia is not involved in the licensing of emoji images from any vendors listed on this site.

We do not provide licensing information or services for third party vendors. This includes Apple, Google, Microsoft, Samsung, HTC, LG, Twitter, Facebook, JoyPixels, OpenMoji and emojidex.

To the best of our knowledge, specific information about licensing emojis from Apple, Facebook, WhatsApp or Samsung is not publicly available.

Additional Notes

  • 👉 Unless otherwise stated, emoji images are © copyright, and enquiries about commercial licensing of emoji images should be directed to their respective font vendors.
  • 📃 Unicode has additional guidance on the use of emoji images which may be helpful.
  • 📧 We are unable to provide contact details for emoji vendors, or further information about licensing third party emoji images.
  • 🧑‍⚖️ We are also not lawyers, so cannot give specific advice on which scenarios might be considered an acceptable fair use of emoji images. We advise you to use your judgement in this area.
  • 🧳 More details about who owns emoji can be found on our blog.

Emojipedia creates original images in a glossy style for the Emojipedia Sample Image Collection, which you are welcome to use in articles with attribution to Emojipedia 👍

Last year, it was announced that people could register Emoji domain names. Name.com (and others) wrote about how to register these domain names, although I have no idea how many Emoji domain names have been registered. There was also a fair amount of mainstream press that covered this news, especially when it came to Coca Cola’s usage of an Emoji domain name (a .WS domain name).

Earlier this week, GoDaddy launched a search engine to find and register available .WS Emoji domain names: ❤❤❤.ws. Based off my recollection alone, there seems to be much more news this time, presumably because GoDaddy is making it easier for people to find and register Emoji .WS domain names.

I am curious if you would ever consider registering an Emoji domain name if they were available in any extension. Personally, I am not much of an Emoji user. I add a smiley face here and there in text messages, but that’s about it. I don’t think I would be a user, although if they were available in all extensions and there was a market for emoji url, I would probably invest.

Vote in the poll below and share your thoughts in the comment section:

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1 COMMENT

I don’t see a market developing for these anytime soon. Maybe somewhat at the reg fee level but not for investment purposes. If they were available in another extension, I’m sure there would be more interest.

My Emoji use is also limited to a smiley face here and there. If anyone other than my wife sends me more than that, they’re suspect.

This is nonsense , but will get some regs after the buzz, it takes time to enter emoji because you have to change keyboards in your smartphone, and nobody will be able to enter the url

I would in .com, .us, and possibly .co.

As a brand name? No. Awkward in conversation.

As a primary online address? No. Difficult type-in navigation. Ambiguity would lead to cybersquatting and phishing.

As an investment? No. Difficult sales pitch.

For a marketing campaign? Depends. Should be useful in a few cases. So if it fit a client’s objectives …

Emojis remind me of the stickers we used to get on our homework assignments, thanks to patronizing kindergarten teachers. Call me a grumpy luddite, but I much prefer words.

I really like emoji domain names. I registered over 600+ in the .WS extension. I have the (pancake emoji) .WS for example redirecting to my Twitter page. Words can be misspelt and limited by language. Emojis can be misinterpreted however universal.

I just learned about empji domains from George Verdugo.
I thought its a cool concept. I
I registered a few of them.
I agree with Derryl. We’ll see what will happen.

I believe Emoji Domains are akeen to a Sleeping Giant waiting to be Awoken.

Multinational Companies, Corporations and Startups are already using Emoji Domains to capture Millenial and Generation Y consumers around the world which access the Internet via their Mobile Devices (i.e., Honda, Ray-Ban, Norweigan Airlines, Budweiser, MGM Grand, Glambot …)

Individual Influencers are also already using Emoji Domains for their Personal Websites/Blogs or to forward to their existing Social Media Accounts (Linkedin, Twitter, Instagram …)

Apple and MAC OS just made it easier to Access and Type Emojis on their Desktops/Laptops with their Keyboard Shortcut (Ctrl, Comm, Space) along with their new Emoji feature on the new Macbook Pro’s Touch Bar.

PCs will follow suite, in order to compete, with MAC and this will make Emoji Domains just a feasible for Desktop/Laptop users as they are now for Mobile Users.

Lastly, Emoji Domains Transcend Language Barriers (even more so than Numeric domains), are Easy to Remember and are Easy to Share.

How to buy an emoji domain

Emoji domains are growing in popularity – but is this just a fad? Image credit: profiletree.com

Yes you have read that correctly. Emoji Domains! While you don’t often see many emojis in domains, they have been around for quite a while. As a matter of fact they have been around since 2001 when the first emoji domain was bought.

The one problem being back then in 2001, no one could see the brilliant cartoon pictures.

With the rise of emojis since the early 2000’s, people have been using them more and more. But are emoji Domain’s relevant or should people just stick to using the laughing face when they’re texting their friends?

Can emojis be the new hashtag or will they fade out quicker than fidget spinners? Some people may even say hashtags have been short lived but, but they’ve made a lasting impact on the way we communicate and find information online.

Let’s see if emoji domains are a gimmick, or if they have an actual use for businesses.

How to buy an emoji domain

Emoji domains can be an excellent CRO boost, but are they always appropriate. Image credit: ProfileTree.

History of Emojis

The first ever mobile devices which allowed emojis hit the market in 1999. At this time, a Japanese telecoms company released the original 176 cartoon pictures and labelled them emojis.

But why are they called emojis?

Most people assume it’s to do with the word emoticon. Actually, in Japanese, the letter ‘e’ represents the word picture, and the word ‘moji’ is a character. Emoji simply means picture character. Sounds simple now.

When the first emojis were released, they were very simple and neat. No one really knew how to use them properly and since then they have been used to describe how people are feeling and their body language over text.

How do Emoji Domains Work?

Emoji domains work in a very unique way. Every emoji is converted into Unicode, which is the xn code you’ll see the emoji convert into within the address bar.

Emoji domains also use ASCII, which stands for American Standard Code for Information Interchange. This code can only be understood by computers.

Essentially, this converts every letter and character into a string of numbers. Until 2010 this was the only way emoji domains could be registered.

In 2010 algorithms called ToASCII and ToUnicode were developed to translate Unicode into ASCII and vice versa.

A process called Punycode then creates the domain names based on these algorithms. This is why you will see the xn address in the address bar when you search an emoji domain.

Who Creates Emojis?

A non-profit organisation is in charge of defining emoji characters and encoding new emojis into Unicode.

The company is called Unicode Consortium and was founded in 1991. Since 2010 registering emoji domains have become harder as they can only be registered at country code top-level domains and there are only a handful of country codes that allow this.

For example the UK and US top level domains don’t support emojis. Two country codes you can use for emoji domains are as follows:

  • .ws (Western Samoa)
  • .to (Tonga)

Every few months Unicode Consortium asks for suggestions for new emojis. In March 2018, Emoji 11.0 was released. This brought over 150 new emojis into the world.

New characters with different hair styles were included in the new emoji pack, as well as male and female superheroes. Many animals were included in this including a badger, a peacock, a kangaroo and parrot.

Unique items such as a skateboard, a compass, toilet roll, infinity and a softball were also included.

2016 was the year emoji’s took off, with over 250 emojis being added to the lexicon.

One of the most popular emojis, the rolling around with laughter face was also added in 2016.

Problems with Emoji Domains

As great you might think emoji domains sound, there are plenty of problems to consider. One of the biggest problems is that not all emojis show the same on different devices and browsers.

For instance, some emojis may be quite realistic on some devices, and more cartoonish on others. Examples of this is below;

  • Water on iOS is shown as a single tap whereas on Android it is shown as a sign.
  • The dizzy face on Apple is shown as a cross-eyed face, whereas on Facebook and Messenger it is shown as spiralled eyes.

How to buy an emoji domain

Different emojis are displayed differently on different devices. Image credit: ProfileTree.

There are also a large number of very similar emojis. This can be quite confusing for users when searching up web addresses/domains. For example, there are at least 6 different grinning faces.

If you used one of these in your domain name, chances are that most users would fail to choose the right one. Then they’re unlikely to find your site.

You may even go onto a different domain by entering the wrong emoji in the bar. As a backup, you’d need to buy all six domains and use redirections to your actual site.

Most human emojis offer a choice of six different skin tones. This again increases the awkwardness when emojis are used for a domain.

Each one of the different skin tones is technically a different emoji.

As you can imagine it might be difficult to find the correct domain. This also means there could be six possible domains from the ‘one’ emoji, which can cause issues when people are trying to reach certain sites.

Another problem emoji domains have is how accessible emojis are. Most devices support devices, but not all users know how to find them.

On desktops to access emojis you will need to find your virtual keyboard. On Windows and MacOS, this is buried within your accessibility settings. Most users won’t even know that it exists.

Getting to the emoji’s on desktop is a task in itself.

Access on mobiles and tablets is still quite difficult too. This is because you need to go onto a separate keyboard to find them. There are hundreds and hundreds of emoji’s so to find the right emoji for you, you will need to go left and right quite a few times.

Because of this, emoji domains will greatly limit your chances of getting any direct or organic traffic. That is, if people don’t know how to type in emojis, they’ll never search for your site.

Will Emoji Domains Ever Take Off?

Emoji domains will probably never be widely used. Firstly registering a domain is difficult, and you can only use a small number of unpopular top level domains. Secondly, emoji domains will hurt your traffic more than helping it.

However, there are still some scenarios where you might use an emoji in your domain.

Emoji domains are a great Easter egg a company can use to increase creativity in their campaigns.

Coca-Cola used an emoji domain once for an advertising campaign and it was successful. They used the smiley face domain, the smiley face being one of the most used emojis.

I became convinced that it was only a matter of time before everyone started using emoji, and, sure enough, by 2013, emoji are everywhere. They even made an appearance in the first episode of the new season of HBO’s Girls (and no, I can’t explain Shoshanna’s emoji choice of a panda next to a gun next to a wrapped gift). But as Larry David once said of a woman’s text-message smiley-face, “Be careful.”

Should you be using emoji? That’s really up to you, but should you make an attempt, here are some tips to help you transition into our new era of human communication:

DO:

Personalize friends’ and family members’ contacts by putting emoji in their names.

Use fruits and vegetables as sexual innuendo (eggplant, peach, strawberry, etc.).

Taunt your parents who have iPhones, but still don’t know what emoji is.

Send dozens of identical emoji to emphasize your point.

Use the Japanese-maple-leaf emoji to communicate with a drug dealer, or just when you really want maple syrup.

Treat your emoji as color swatches: Try texting just in beige.

Use the blue-diamond, gun, and skull emoji to recap Breaking Bad episodes.

Use the two-hump camel instead of the one-hump camel (who knows why there are both).

Use whitespace to your advantage: A lot can be said by spacing emoji out over many lines.

Use the nose emoji between the fishcake or spiral emoji to express “My mind has been totally blown.”

Use the limited set of national flags to foster international diplomacy.

DON’T:

Hold back: You can never send too many emoji.

Mix emoji and English in same text.

Use the lesbian-couple emoji to try to set up a threesome with your girlfriend.

Question emoji’s bias toward Japanese food and culture.

Ever use the man-with-the-turban emoji.

Use the purple Star of David emoji to refer to your Jewish friend.

Try to buy an emoji domain name, even if you figure out how: It is not widely supported by browsers.

Worry about sending emoji to your friends whose phones don’t have it: It’s even funnier when they can’t figure it out.

Send the kissy-face emoji to your intern.

Mix up the direction of the gun emoji: Remember it points from right to left.

Try to post emoji to Facebook: It only supports a fraction of the hundreds available.

Use the water emoji to represent any bodily fluids.


Fred Benenson is the editor of
Emoji Dick and current contestant in the New Yorker cover contest with a submission made up of, yes, emoji.

Follow The Culture Blog on RSS and on Twitter at @ESQCulture.

I have registered my domain name to a website that hosts the emoji domain, but I do not know how to register a domain.

How do I register a emoji domain without a domain name?

What is a domain registration?

How do you register an emoji website?

What are the differences between a domain and a website?

How can I learn more about domain registration and domain registrars?

How to register an Emoji domain registration article A domain registration is the process of making a new domain name and entering the domain name into an online registration system.

It is an easy process that you can follow online.

Here are some key things you need to be aware of when it comes to registering an Emojis domain.

Registering an emoji site online is easy and takes less than five minutes.

There are several options available to you.

Some are free, others require registration.

You can also pay for a domain, however, there are several services that will help you with that.

A free domain name can be registered in about an hour.

You may also need to register your domain with a third party.

Domain names and domain registration are both free, but there are a few important points that you need for each option.

Registration costs $20.00 USD.

The registration fee will be charged to your PayPal account.

Once you pay the fee, the domain registration will begin.

Once your domain is registered, you can click on “Create a new name” to create a new website.

This website is used by your Emoji account to store your Emojisfare content.

You will be able to use the domain for your Emotional Support Services and other purposes.

The domain name you choose is valid for 365 days.

This means that if your domain expires within that time period, you will lose your domain name.

Domain name registration fees can be paid for online or by mail.

Domain Name Registration Fees You can register your emoji domain name online for $20 USD, or you can use the PayPal method.

If you choose to use PayPal, you must provide a valid email address.

If your domain does not exist yet, you should email domain [email protected]

Your domain registration fee includes a registration fee for your domain, domain name, and domain name registration fee.

If this fee is paid, your domain will be valid for 90 days.

Domain registration is available to everyone.

Domain registrations are also available to businesses, corporations, and individuals.

The fee for domain registrations varies depending on whether you choose online or mail registration.

When you register your EmoSafes domain, you need a domain account.

You need a valid e-mail address to register for domain registration.

Domain account requirements and limitations You must have a valid domain name account to register.

If the domain doesn’t exist yet or if you do not have a domain to register, you may need to contact the domain registrant for help with that domain.

Domain registrers can help you find your domain registration provider online.

Domain Registrars Domain registrar websites are accessible from all over the world.

Many of these domains can be found on the internet through Google, Bing, Yahoo, and others.

Domain registry sites allow you to create domains that you will use to store information, or domains that are accessible to others through the internet.

Domain management is easy.

Domain accounts are simple to set up and maintain.

Domain servers and domain names can be purchased for very little money.

If a domain is already registered, it will automatically renew its registration at the end of the year.

If not, you have a few options for renewing your domain.

You have the option of renewing it at any time.

You also have the ability to renew a domain at a reduced price.

The cost of renewals depends on the domain, and the type of domain that you have registered.

You are able to choose the amount of renewal, and you can also choose if the domain should be deleted after one year.

There is a limit on the number of domains that can be renewed, and there are fees associated with renewals.

You do not need to pay any additional fees to renew your domain or domain name for this to work.

Domain Domain registrants can help with managing your domain account and domain account details.

If there is a problem with your domain’s account information, you are able and able to contact domain registrants.

Domain administrator accounts can help manage your domain settings.

Domain administrators can help update your domain information.

Domain domain registration fees vary depending on the type and amount of domains you register.

The fees associated to your domain can range from $20 to $250.00.

You must purchase the domain and domain domain registration information from domain registrs, and then provide your e-mails and passwords to domain registraers.

The information you provide is used for domain renewal and domain maintenance.

Domain renewal and maintenance domain account information is used to manage your account information

Buy Single Emoji Domains to market and promote your brand or business. Emoji domains work just like a normal webpage domain. The only difference is they contain emojis. This make your webpage and brand stand out.

You can buy these emoji domains from Magic Whiteboard. We use ✨.ws, type this in your phone. Email us at [email protected] to buy an emoji domain

Single emoji domains are the most valuable and distinctive.

🔑.ws is a fantastic emoji domain for a key company like Timpsons. Only £10,000

🛌.ws is great emoji domain for a bed company like Dreams. Only £10,000

🛍.ws is ideal for a shopping brand like ASOS. Only £10,000

🏘.ws is an ideal emoji domain for estate agentslike Rightmove. Only £10,000

🦛.ws is an ideal emoji domain for Hippo Insurance hippo.com £15000

🦒.ws is an ideal emoji domain for London Zoo £10,000

✨.ws is a great emoji domain for Twitter £50,000

🗣.ws is a great emoji domain for Voice.com £20,000

🎫.ws is an ideal emoji domain for a ticket company like TicketMastet £20,000

💷.ws is an emoji domain for a financial company £25,000

Email us at [email protected] to make an offer for our emoji domains.

What are emoji domains? 👀 👇

5 billion 😃 emojis are being used every day on social media, including Facebook, Snapchat, Whatsapp, Twitter, YouTube, TripAdvisor and Instragram.

Google now allows you to search 🔎 using emojis . Emoji search is the fastest growing search technique 📈

An emoji domain is a domain with an emoji in it .

🎫.ws 🦛.ws 🛍.ws 🔑.ws

💷.ws 🦒.ws ✨.ws 🗣.ws

fly✈️.ws 777🎰.ws 🏘.ws

Budweiser uses ❤️ 🍺.ws

MGM Grand in Las Vegas uses 🃏.ws

MailChimp uses 👋.ws

.ws is a global domain extension , just like

.com or .co.uk, some people say it means w eb s ite.

Emoji domain names are short, visual & memorable . Your brand will stand out and will rank higher in Google 👍

This turned out to be a bit of an expensive joke but I recently bought the domain 🍊.tk, It’s a freaking emoji domain name? how cool it that? I wasn’t even aware it was possible but with a bit of research I manage to get it working.

How it works

You can’t just head over to Godaddy (other domain providers available) and buy . com. The problem is URL’s have a limited character set (A-Z, 0-9) but say you wanted to register pilé.com you could use a punycode to generate the é.

So you register the domain including the punycode for the é and browsers convert the character for you.

The same can be done with emojis, most extensions like .com and many of the new domain extension don’t allow for these punycodes but there are a few which do like .ws & .tk.

It’s a bit of a slog trying to find places that you can trust to buy these extension so I thought I was onto a winner when I found out Godaddy do sell .tk and didn’t seem to mind the weird http://xn--ki8h.tk domain name. That was until I bought it and I couldn’t do anything with it. I just wanted to forward it to neilorangepeel.com and send out a few tweets but there was no option to do this and I had to call their tech team who seem to struggle to understand why I couldn’t forward it. Turns out you can’t actually forward a .tk domain which effectively leaves my emoji domain useless. So I popped over to Freenom.com and picked up 🟠.ml which worked with 5mins.

Coca-cola used emoji domains in a promotion a few years ago.

What to do now?

I’m not really sure. They are certainly fun but there are still a bunch of compatibility issues, many platforms like Facebook just don’t recognise them as URL’s so you can’t click on them. Hopefully this will change and we’ll see a bunch of 💩💩💩.com springing up.

The permanent registrar migration successfully completed on May the 4th and people started registering new names and migrating existing names.

First Week Stats of the ENS Permanent Registrar

The new permanent ENS registrar was launched at midnight UTC on May 4th, just over a week ago.

There is no hurry to use the new registrar as the migration deadline is another year away but I would like to introduce a new feature so that you may be tempted to try out our new registrar as well as hack a new service which takes advantage of it.

In addition, the registrar is an ERC721 compliant nonfungable token contract, meaning that .eth registrations can be transferred in the same fashion as other NFTs.

This brief description not only made some people very excited but fast moving service to jump onto the feature.

So how do you actually see your new shiny ENS name as NFT?

Some wallet (such as Balance Manager) supports NFT via OpenSea so it should appear in your wallet.

How to buy an emoji domain

You can also search ENS names from OpenSea directly which is very cool!

How to buy an emoji domain

Kevin Owocki from Gitcoin recently tweeted that emoji is vital in meme campaign.

We got this, Kevin!

You can register unicode which means you can have emoji as ENS name.

Some savvy users already registered their killer emojis.

Emoji ENS name is NFT? This is a mind blowing combo!

How to buy an emoji domain

One of the benefits of ENS being ERC721 compatible is that you can use your existing NFT dev knowledge. However, there are a few things which are unique to ENS based NFT (plus Emoji unicode quirks) you have to be aware of when hacking.

Q: How do you figure out the new ENS registrar address?

You can find it as a controller of eth domain at ENS manager. Rather than hard coding the address, I suggest fetching programatically. After instantiating an ENS registry object, you can ask the owner of .eth domain as follows in most ENS supported js libraries.

Q: How do you find out if a given ENS name is ERC721 compatible?

The easiest way is to enquire the ENS registrar if the given name is available on the registrar as oppose to the old registrar which does not support ERC721. You can do so by calling Registrar.ownerOf(uint256 tokenId) (here is the exact line of the code).

If you are writing a service which handles both old and new registrar, then you can also use EIP-165 to introspect to the contract if it supports ERC 721 interfaces as follows.

NOTE: These functions are less likely be supported by the ENS libraries, hence you may want to access to these smart contract directly.

Q: How do you find out tokenId ?

To transfer any tokens (and to lookup if the given ENS is ERC721 compatible), you need to specify tokenid. In our doc, it explains as follows.

The registrar works exclusively with label hashes — the keccak256 of the first component of the label (eg, keccak256(‘ens’) for ens.eth ). For compatibility with ERC721, these are expressed as uint256 values rather than bytes32, but can be cast backwards and forwards transparently.

Converting into labelhash is keccak256(‘matoken’) in Solidity and web3.utils.soliditySha3(‘matoken’) in web3.js

That is usually enough to call the contract but if you need to convert to uint256 as used in OpenSea url structure, then you can use toBN .

NOTE: It is sometimes confusing whether you should pass label (eg: matoken ) or full ENS name (eg: matoken.eth ) as function arguments. When you interact with registry or resolver, you are more likely to pass ENS name as these contract is in charge of the whole ENS namespace. The registrar, however, is only in charge of the domain which the contract is the owner of, hence you can just pass a label.

Q: Can you register any emojis?

In theory yes, but in reality depends.

Since the ENS contracts only deal with hashes, they have no direct way to enforce limits on what can be registered; character length restrictions are implemented by allowing users to challenge a short name by providing its preimage to prove it’s too short.

This means that you can in theory register both ‘foo.eth’ and ‘FOO.eth’, or even

.eth. However, resolvers such as browsers and wallets should apply the nameprep algorithm to any names users enter before resolving; as a result, names that are not valid outputs of nameprep will not be resolvable by standard resolvers, making them effectively useless.

Got it 🤯 ? Let’s digest this sentence with an example.

For example, 👩‍❤️‍👨 is 6 characters . 👩‍❤‍👨 with 3 ZWJ characters (Zero Width Joiner, a Unicode character that joins two or more other characters together in sequence to create a new emoji) between them like following.

How to buy an emoji domain

However, when we convert the character into namehash (a recursive process that can generate a unique hash for any valid domain name) before registering into ENS, normalise function will truncate one ZWJ character that creates the combined emoji hence will be treated as just 👩‍❤‍👨with 5 chars.

How to buy an emoji domain

NOTE: Normalise does not seem to decompose all combined emojis. For example, rainbow flag is still intact after normalisation

How to buy an emoji domain

With all being said, counting emoji length is as easy as the following

In this blog post, I introduced how to interact with and develop ENS as NFT (+ encouraging the use of more emojis).

Emoji URLs seem to fit perfectly into this day and age: they are funky, striking, and stay in your mind. The younger generation has always managed to incorporate smileys into their everyday life, since they are all over message services and social networks. After the renowned Oxford dictionary chose the laughing with tears emoji to be the word of the year, it seems the funny images are more popular than ever.

So, are emojis a logical development in written communication? They are already vital for communication among youngsters. In the meantime, they’re even popping up in browser address-bars: as emoji URLs. How do you register an emoji domain? What benefits does it have? And where does this trend come from?

  1. From emoticons to emoji domains – the story of the digital smiley
  2. Emojis – the graphical development of emoticons
  3. Why were emojis developed in the first place?
  4. How are smiley URLs technically possible?
  5. Setting up an emoji URL– why not use .com?
  6. Setting up an emoji URL: how are smileys added?
  7. The benefits of smiley URLs
  8. Why emoji domain names can still be problematic

From emoticons to emoji domains – the story of the digital smiley

Emojis originate from the dark times before digital communication. In 1982, the characters ‘:-)’ were entered and that’s where everything began. The computer science professor Scott Fahlman used a bulletin board on the intranet of the University of Pittsburgh where he worked. This bulletin board could be described as the forerunner of today’s discussion forum. He created the smiley out of a series of characters and made the first ever emoticon – the basis for the emojis used today from pixels or vectors. These are visually more appealing than the plain emoticons from back then.

In the internet’s earlier years, emoticons were the only way to get a feeling across in comments, posts, or e-mails. The emoticon language quickly developed a life of its own and spread globally thanks to the emerging mobile SMS communication. Smileys were used even more frequently and became more complex in order to express more complicated emotions.

From a linguistic point of view, the emoticons’ non-verbal ‘language’ is particularly interesting, since it’s been possible to use faces, animals, plants, or entire image compositions to convey emotions for a long time. Since the 1990s, abstract ASCII characters have been used to create works of art, which have been spread over message boards and discussion forums. There are practically no limits when it comes to the Japanese emoticons of ASCII art e.g. Kaomoji. A prominent example of this type of art is the so-called table flip ノಠل͟ಠ༽ノ-︵-┻━┻, which symbolises the angry turning over of a table.

Emojis – the graphical development of emoticons

The trend towards graphically appealing emoticons started in the late 1990s in Japan. The technical advancement of mobile phones and their displays made it possible to show the right smileys instead of the binary character strings that were originally used to express feelings or moods. Images started to be used to respond to short messages, because the Japanese mobile network was becoming overloaded with over 80 million manic writers. The images were therefore developed to relieve the network.

The word ’emoji’ is a neologism consisting of the Japanese words ‘picture’ (e) and ‘characters’ (moji). The inventor of the modern emoji was Shigetaka Kurita, who worked on the ambitious i-mode project in the late 1990s. This was the foundation of the first large mobile internet platform for daily newsfeeds, weather reports, entertainment, event reservations, and more. Due to the modest device hardware and the limited data transfer possibilities, some limitations had to be allowed. One example is that only adjectives could be used for the weather forecast. To get around this, images such as clouds and suns could be used, and this would reduce the transmission volume of the i-mode provider.

Why were emojis developed in the first place?

One of the reasons for creating and further developing the emojis comes down to the peculiarities of the Japanese language. Without being able to have a face-to-face conversation, some Japanese phrases can end up being misinterpreted. Without being able to see gestures and facial expressions, a casual sentence can be interpreted positively, negatively, or disinterestedly. Kurita decided to attempt the task of drawing human facial expressions in a small box consisting of 12 x 12 pixels and use 176 characters to turn human emotion into mobile electronic communication.

Since the technical capabilities weren’t very advanced, the results weren’t exactly visually appealing. Many emojis could only be identified if you used your imagination and even then, the meaning wasn’t 100% obvious. Scott Fahlman, the inventor of the emoticons, came to the conclusion that the creations were ‘rather ugly’. The success of i-mode, however, prompted other Japanese mobile providers to copy this emoji concept. This resulted in many different emoji systems that weren’t compatible with each other. It was only in 2012 that the different emoji systems in Japan were standardised to reduce errors when sending and receiving emojis using different providers.

Emojis have become more and more popular since they were implemented internationally on iPhone in iOS versions 5 in 2011. Afterwards, they were adapted to Android devices and other mobile operating systems. Android, however, limited itself to one emoji system. It’s difficult to imagine a time when these colourful little graphics weren’t all over Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and other social media platforms.

How are smiley URLs technically possible?

ICANN deemed it a technical possibility to create domain names with non-ASCII characters as early on as 2003 with its ‘Internationalizing Domain Names in Applications‘ system or ‘IDNA’ for short. This was long before the first emoji URL was registered in 2011.

IDNs (‘Internationalized Domain Names’) can be created using Unicode, the widespread, international coding standard with over 120,000 characters from dozens of scripts and symbol sets. Virtually all web browsers already support Unicode. IDNs enable most non-ASCII characters in the Unicode repertoire to be displayed as ASCII-compatible character strings. Since the latest Unicode standard also contains many emojis, the door for emoji domains is theoretically open.

DNS uses a limited amount of the already relatively limited ASCII character set. Punycode is used to translate a domain name that contains complex Unicode characters. A Punycode string consists exclusively of the letters A-Z, the digits 0-9 and the dash symbol. Because this translation takes place in the web browser and not in the DNS, the IDNs work without further changes. Practically every conceivable character can be converted into a URL after being converted into Punycode. Registering emoji URLs is now possible.

At Social Media Marketing World, in Sand Diego, I met some amazing people and brands including the .ws Emoji Domain company. Emojis are the newest universal language for this and future generations. The Emoji Domains product is going to revolutionize your traffic and marketing forever!

Emoji Domains have arrived, and there’s plenty to go around! In this post I’ll answer all your burning questions and show you how to use them to advance your business and why you should.

How to buy an emoji domain

This post contains affiliate links. To see my full disclosure, click here.

What are Emoji Domains?

An Emoji Domain is simply a URL made up of only Emojis or emojis plus text. For example:

I❤️blogging.ws

I❤️toblog.ws

There are over 2,500 different Emoji, and you can mix Emoji with text, so imagine all the possibilities! And the .ws, that stands for “website.” The cool part is that these characters transcend languages. 😍 is 😍 no matter which language you speak, and they are said to evoke emotions (hence “emoji”) which mimic actual human face emotions giving the reader a simulated face to face emotional response. There are currently thousands of different supported Emoji characters, including items, not just faces. A full list of current and proposed Emoji can be viewed at the Unicode Consortium’s website.

Emoji Domains are purchased on a year by year license just like “normal” domain names. Get yours here.

How does it work?

According to website.ws, “When you type in a website to visit in your web browser, the name is encoded using a special system called Punycode. Every character in existence can be written in this special code that uses just regular Latin letters and numbers (ABCs and 123s).”

So, when you, the human, see a domain like www.🌴🎵.ws , your computer understands it as a special code: www.xn--xh8h8h.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

Why would I want an Emoji Domain?

Not only is it just cool, there is a practical reason and a three marketing reasons why your brand needs an Emoji Domain.

All modern web browsers and mobile phones support Emoji. You’re already using them (or at least seeing them) in social media messages, emails, etc. Emoji Domains shorten the keystrokes necessary to arrive at your site.

Everyone is thumbs when typing on their phones, so shortening TheBlogConnection.com to I❤️toblog.ws cuts 21 characters to 11. Half the time and half the typing mistakes, making it faster to get there from mobile or desktop. If you can land a one or two emoji domain that’s just 3 or 4 characters!

  1. Marketing reason #1: the world is going visual. We have icons for mail, social media, apps and locations. It just makes sense to give your business a visual icon that makes you more “findable” and “identifiable” on the web. Plus someone might not be able to spell correctly Paradise or Bloggers, but when they can just type in the icons 🌴💻.ws and end up in our Facebook community, we’ve eliminated that potential barrier to reaching them.
  2. Marketing reason #2: Emoji Domains are great for branding. Lemonhass.com is meaningless unless you know the brand, and perhaps hard to remember, but when you see 🍋🥑.ws, that’s memorable, especially to visual learners! And look how great this looks on business cards!How to buy an emoji domain
  3. Marketing reason #3: Hubspot reported that 64% of email senders saw an increase in open rate when using Emoji in the subject line, and using Emoji on social media also created an increase in engagement, something I have also seen to be true in my own business.

How to buy an emoji domain

I already have a domain name. How would I use this?

I ❤️ the way you think! There are millions of possibilites. While you can use Emoji Domains as your primary domain, you can also redirect them. Redirect them to your home page, sales page, opt-in page, group forum page, an engagement site, the social media you’re most wanting to grow….

How to buy an emoji domain

To purchase and Emoji Domain,

  1. Go to DomainCostClub
  2. Search for the Emoji domain you want
  3. Add it to your cart
  4. Check out. I purchased more than 5, so I added on the $29 domain membership package.

Membership grants you all of the following benefits:

How to buy an emoji domain

If you know you’re going to buy more than one, I highly recommend the DomainCostClub over Godaddy because your renewals and total expense will be cheaper in the end. Believe me, I’ve already purchased 8 Emoji Domains and have plans for a few more!

Once your purchase is complete, you can redirect your domain by

  1. Going to your account, to control panelHow to buy an emoji domain
  2. Click my domains How to buy an emoji domain
  3. Click [change] under DNS settings
  4. Forward to, paste in the domain you want to be the destination How to buy an emoji domain
  5. And save.

Don’t miss the 🚤! Get your Emoji Domain Today!

Patrick Lucas Austin

How to buy an emoji domain

I used to think I could get rich off domain flipping. Casino.com sold for $US5.5 million ($7 million) in 2003, and PrivateJet.com sold for $US30.18 million ($38.5 million) in 2012. I’ve since given up on the concept, opting to spend my time purchasing domains for inside jokes rather than retirement plan gambles. While I’m pretty sure you won’t get as lucky as Sex.com (a cool $US13 million [$16.6 million]) you can still score a pretty cool one thanks to ?.to, a site created by BetaList founder Marc Köhlbrugge offering an easy way to purchase emoji-based domain names, and see which ones have been snatched up.

?.to uses the domain name registrar Register.to and the .to (that’s Tonga) top level domain to handle registration. To get at the domain, you can either use the corresponding emoji or its text representation to get to your domain.

How to buy an emoji domain

But just because you can buy a custom emoji domain, does that mean you should? As long as you can enter emoji into whatever URL bar you’re using — and aren’t spending exorbitant cash, or expecting a big return on investment — there’s no harm in making a purchase. If you’re using Windows 10, look for the Touch Keyboard icon in the bottom right of your screen. Mac users can hit Command-Control-Space to bring up the emoji selection box.

You can also customise your emoji-friendly domain by adding text. Perhaps you’d like to telegraph your hatred of insects through your domain? Well you can register a certain idontlike?.to for a year at $US45 ($58).

As with the original introduction of the domain name, enterprising scalpers are grabbing all the good ones — ☺️.to is totally available, as long as you have $US9,999 ($12,783). And I obviously can’t get ?.to, and ?.to is long gone, as well. That said, you can grab some lesser-known emoji for under $US50 ($64), come up with creative combinations to make them your own, or try to sell off your new domain and rake in the ? (?.to is taken).

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How to get an emoji domain 👨‍💻

How to buy an emoji domain

Emoji domains are all the rage at the moment.

Sadly, or maybe for the better, .com, .net, and .org TLDs won’t allow the use of emojis as it is agains rule IDN2008 set in action by the ICANN in 2010. The background is to prevent a thing calles homograph attacks, where an attacker will use similar “graphs” = letter from foreign languages to simulate a valid domain.

Let me give a short example of such a homograph attack:

This link to apple.com which likely shows as https://apple.com/ in your browser is actually this URL https://xn--80ak6aa92e.com/. This works because the browser allows punycode, a notation to translate unicode characters into latin strings, a means of implementing the IDN, international domain naming system.

In this example, the letter “a” is replaced by a cyrillic letter that is very similar: “а” (U+0430). Since unicode characters are translated to punycode, the domain name reads https://xn--80ak6aa92e.com/. However, some browsers (testing on Firefox Dev Edition 59.0b12 (64-Bit)) will show the actual unicode symbols and not the punycode. This is why the homograph attack works. The domain is shown as apple.com while in the background it is more like “cyrillic a”pple.com. Read more on the blog of the maker of this example attack.

Now to come back to our initial topic, emojis are simply unicode characters like the cyrillic “а”, and the browser will translate them into punycode. For example, the aforementioned “a” becomes xn--80a.

If you now want the camera symbol as a domain name, copy the unicode char (look at emojipedia for inspiration and easy copying) and paste it into the punycoder. You receive the punycode xn--tu8h which you can now use with a registrar, for example freenom, to register a xn--tu8h domain. Have a look at 📷.ga.

Here are my emoji domains for the lab page (http://lab.chross.de): 👨‍🔬.ga 👨‍💻.ga

Note that these are multi-character emojis where two symbols “man and microscope” are bound together to form another character “researcher”. This is not displayed in every browser equally. They should show as:

Buy Single Emoji Domains to market and promote your brand or business.
Emoji domains work just like a normal webpage domain. The only difference is they contain emojis. This will make your webpage and brand stand out.

You can buy the best emoji domains from Magic Whiteboard.
Magic Whiteboard use ✨.ws, type this in your phone it forwards to www.magicwhiteboard.co.uk

Single emoji domains are the most valuable and distinctive.

🔑.ws is a fantastic emoji domain for a key company like Timpsons.

🛌.ws is great emoji domain for a bed company like Dreams.

🛍.ws is ideal for a shopping brand like ASOS.

🏘.ws is an ideal emoji domain for estate agentslike Rightmove.

🦛.ws is an ideal emoji domain for Hippo Insurance hippo.com

🦒.ws is an ideal emoji domain for London Zoo

✨.ws is a great emoji domain for Twitter

🗣.ws is a great emoji domain for Voice.com

🎫.ws is an ideal emoji domain for a ticket company like TicketMaster

💷.ws is an emoji domain for a financial company

Email us at [email protected] to ask questions about emoji domains or to make an offer.

You can pay using escrow.com if you prefer this method of payment.

What are emoji domains?👀 👇

An emoji domain is a domain with an emoji in it.

🎫.ws 🦛.ws 🛍.ws 🔑.ws

💷.ws 🦒.ws ✨.ws 🗣.ws

fly✈️.ws 777🎰.ws 🏘.ws

Budweiser uses ❤️ 🍺.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

✨.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--0ci.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

🛌.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--778h.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

🛍.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--878h.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

🎫.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--cl8h.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

🗣️.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--k18h.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

🔑.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--kv8h.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

🏘.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--mm8h.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

🦛.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--rt9h.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

💷.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--zs8h.ws

How to buy an emoji domain

🦒.ws Single Emoji Domain – Punycode xn--it9h.ws

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Buy Single Emoji Domains to market and promote your brand or business. Emoji domains work just like a normal webpage domain. The only difference is they contain emojis. This make your webpage and brand stand out.

You can buy these emoji domains from Magic Whiteboard. We use ✨.ws, type this in your phone.

Single emoji domains are the most valuable and distinctive.

🔑.ws is a fantastic emoji domain for a key company like Timpsons. Only £9500

🛌.ws is great emoji domain for a bed company like Dreams. Only £9500

🛍.ws is ideal for a shopping brand like ASOS. Only £9500

🏘.ws is an ideal emoji domain for estate agentslike Rightmove. Only £4950

🦛.ws is an ideal emoji domain for Hippo Insurance hippo.com £15000

🦒.ws is an ideal emoji domain for London Zoo £4950

✨.ws is a great emoji domain for Twitter £15,000

🗣.ws is a great emoji domain for Voice.com £20,000

🎫.ws is an ideal emoji domain for a ticket company like TicketMastet £20,000

💷.ws is an emoji domain for a financial company £25,000

Email us at [email protected] to make an offer for our emoji domains.

What are emoji domains?👀 👇

5 billion 😃 emojis are being used every day on social media, including Facebook, Snapchat, Whatsapp, Twitter, YouTube, TripAdvisor and Instragram.

Google now allows you to search 🔎 using emojis . Emoji search is the fastest growing search technique 📈

The plural of the word “emoji” may still be up for debate, but the popularity of these symbols no longer is. Google just spent eighteen months redesigning their emoji. Apple made emoji of their leadership team for World Emoji Day 2018 and also just released 70 new emoji, including new hair designs (you are officially recognized red heads).

How to buy an emoji domainHow does this relate to websites, you ask?

Let’s talk emoji domains. They’re here. And they’re gaining traction. Maybe. Probably. Only time will tell, but you need to be in the loop all the same.

First things first, what are emoji?

If you don’t know the word, you know them by sight. These small digital images and icons are ubiquitous in online conversations—whether they should be or not.

A 😀 can express happiness. A ❤️ can express love. A 🤔 can capture the mood of the latest news that makes you stop and think, or there’s always the 😂, also known as “Face With Tears of Joy,” which Apple has noted is the most popular emoji on iphones in the U.S. by far.

Some consider them childish, and others call them “the first language born of the digital world.” The emoji of today were derived from the simple 🙂 and 8-D style expressions of early internet message boards. They first appeared on Japanese phones in the late 1990s, and their popularity has only spread from there.

The first three emoji domains (☮️.com, ♨️.com, ♨️.net) were registered on April 19, 2001, but at this point, these were largely theoretical in application. The first emoji domain in action was 💩.la in 2011—no, we didn’t make that up—and also in 2011, Apple added an official emoji keyboard. “😂” was the Oxford English Dictionary’s “word” of the year for 2015, and “The Emoji Movie” was released in theaters in 2017. They are everywhere, and it seems like they will continue to be.

Not everyone speaks the same language. Not everyone can read or understand the jargon of a given industry, but everyone understands images.

Are people buying and using emoji domains?

Absolutely. In fact, since the 2015 hackathon when a GoDaddy developer developed i❤️domains.ws, the first emoji search engine, over 25,000 emoji domains have been registered.

Budweiser owns ❤️🍺.ws, and Coca-Cola ran a powerful ad campaign with 😄.ws.

No single emoji domains appear to still be available, but with new emoji continually being released and old domains sometimes expiring, who knows what you can find.

Why are emoji domains using .ws and .fm instead of .com and .org?

While many are swooning (or should we say 😍) over emoji domains, ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers that governs top level domains (TLDs), is not. This isn’t to say that they never will support emoji domains for .com, .org, and other TLDs, but as of this writing, there is no sign of this changing.

What makes things interesting is that country code domains (ccTLDs) are ultimately decided by individual countries. Most countries are following ICANN’s recommendation, but a few are not. These include Western Samoa (.ws), which is considered the most established in this area, but also others including Anguilla (.ai), Laos (.la), and recently the Federated States of Micronesia (.fm).

A select number of emoji domains slipped through the cracks when they were purchased before ICANN made this ruling in 2010 (well played, owner of ☁️.com), but if you’re looking to own your own, look into the available country codes for now.

Do they work in all web browsers?

Yes and no. All browsers will bring someone to the correct website, but some will not display the emoji domains in the address bar. Chrome, for example, translates an emoji domain into punycode, which is admittedly significantly less fun to look at.

Apple’s Safari, on the other hand, does recognize and retain emoji domains in the address bar. Of course, Apple’s been a leader when it comes to emoji from the start.

Are emoji domains really going to be a thing?

If Google and Apple are any indicator of the future of emojis, signs point to yes. Both companies, among many others, are spending a lot of time thinking about their emoji.

Whether you’re looking for a web guy (🕸️👨.ws) or hoping to be inspired by opening a book (📖💡.ws), there’s an emoji domain out there that might meet your needs. And if there isn’t, maybe it’s time to purchase one of your own.

A fad or the future, we don’t yet know. But with the continuing conversation about the future of URLs in general, this is one possibility to keep an eye on.

Questions about what domain might make sense for your business? From keyword strategy to emojis, Midlothian Web Solutions loves conversations like this. Contact us today, and let’s talk about your first steps to digital success.

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